An armoured car at Mountjoy Prison, Dublin, during Republican hunger strike protests in April 1920. Photograph courtesy of the National Library of Ireland

The War of Independence is best remembered for the events of 1920. This was the year of Bloody Sunday; the burnings of Cork, Balbriggan and Trim; the (...)

The front page of French newspaper Le Petit Journal, December 5th, 1920, depicting British police attacking a farm in Tipperary occupied by Sinn Féin members. Photograph: Leemage/UIG via Getty Images

There was more than one war of independence being fought in Ireland in 1920. Alongside an increasingly intense military conflict, there were political(...)

For senior cycle students and teachers, there is a requirement to engage in a balanced, investigative and enquiry-based approach to examining and exploring the evidence surrounding the Irish War of Independence.

Teaching emotive history In the Leaving Certificate classroom, the War of Independence 1919 to 1921 is taught as part of the topic, “The pursuit of s(...)

Auxiliaries celebrate after a failed IRA attack on their quarters in Dublin in April 1921. Photograph courtesy of the National Library of Ireland

ROYAL IRISH CONSTABULARY One of the unintended consequences of the recent row over the proposed commemoration of the Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) i(...)

Telephone operator with protective gauze during the 1918-1919 flu epidemic:  a great many were affected.

Priests visiting the sick and dying are effectively frontline workers in epidemics, and are more likely to catch the disease and even die themselves. (...)

File image of RIC cadets in Dublin. File photograph: Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

The general election was bookended by two episodes which show how remembrance of the State’s past remains current affairs. Fine Gael’s postponed, an(...)

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar: many anticipated the impact of the commemorations on Fine Gael’s election chances. Photograph:  Bryn Lennon/Getty Images

More than 200 messages sent to Taoiseach Leo Varadkar at the height of the controversy over Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) commemorations varied from (...)

Minister for Justice Charlie Flanagan suggested ‘Danny Boy, some Thomas Moore pieces, and anything else which the Garda Band would deem appropriate’ as suitable music for the RIC event, according to internal emails.  Photograph: Dara MacDonaill/The Irish Times

The Department of Justice knew there were likely to be “sensitivities” around their plan for a commemoration for the Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) an(...)

Minister for Justice Charlie Flanagan: instigated   the proposed commemoration for the Royal Irish Constabulary  and the Dublin Metropolitan Police

Nearly 70 per cent of voters believe the Government was right to postpone the proposed commemoration for the Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) and the Du(...)

Jimmy Lawless, grandson of Séamus Lawless who was murdered by the Black and Tans in January 1920, at the spot he was killed on Bridge Street, Balbriggan. Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill/The Irish Times

Jimmy Lawless has plastic bags and boxes of old certificates and yellowing photographs of his grandfather Séamus Lawless, who was killed by the Black (...)

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