Stephen Kenny is worth sticking with; Buccaneers ignoring Brown’s past

The Morning Sports Briefing: Keep ahead of the game with ‘The Irish Times’ sports team

Fulham manager Scott Parker celebrates their late equaliser in the Premier League meeting with Tottenham. Photo: Shaun Botterill/EPA

Fulham manager Scott Parker celebrates their late equaliser in the Premier League meeting with Tottenham. Photo: Shaun Botterill/EPA

Not for the first time we can say it’s been a difficult week for Ireland manager Stephen Kenny. Two of his coaching staff departing two months before the start of World Cup qualifying is not how he would have envisaged things going and it’s another difficult situation to deal with for a manager who is becoming very used to adversity in his short Ireland career so far. What happens away to Serbia and at home to Luxembourg in March could determine a lot of the public feeling towards Kenny but Emmet Malone writes this morning that the former Dundalk manager’s long-term value to the domestic game means he’s worth sticking with. In England, the hastily re-arranged Premier League meeting between Tottenham and Fulham saw José Mourinho’s side let an opponent off the hook again as the visitors equalised late on to earn a point. In the earlier match Manchester City moved within four points of Manchester United with a game in hand thanks to a goal from Phil Foden to see off a stubborn Brighton side.

Moving stateside now and Dave Hannigan writes in his column this morning that the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Tom Brady are turning a blind eye to Antonio Brown’s shameful past as the man accused of sexual assault plays a key part in their playoff run. “If the physical gifts that made Brown arguably the best wide receiver of his generation and earned him more than $70m appear more or less intact, there also seems a legitimate case against him being anywhere near the field at all,” he writes.

The Irish Times
Please subscribe or sign in to continue reading.
The Irish Times

How can I keep reading?

You’ve reached an article that is only available to Irish Times subscribers.

Subscribe today and get the full picture for just €1 for the first month.

Subscribe No obligation, cancel any time.