Student Hub: DCU calls for regulation of student rental sector

News, views and opinions fromStudent Hub contributors and Irish Times writers

 

The president of DCU has called on policy makers to take action to help control the escalating rental cost of student housing. Professor Brian MacCraith said the burden being placed on students and their families by such increases would lead to the creation of a “family-income-based barrier” for entry into third-level education. Éanna Ó Caollaí reports.

Professor MacCraith’s comments came after DCU students held a protest over rent increases of over 20 per cent in privately-owned student accommodation in the Glasnevin area on Thursday. The purpose-built Shanowen Square accommodation complex recently announced a rental increase of 27 per cent for the 2018/2019 academic year while the operators of the nearby Shanowen Halls announced an increase of over 23.5 per cent. Shauna Bowers reports.

Students are set to play a key role in the upcoming abortion referendum. Both sides of the debate are targeting young people as a crucial demographic in a campaign where opinion polls indicate the gap between Yes and No is narrowing. Vote in our student poll.

Up to 60 new places on Irish medium teacher training courses are to be created as part of a €7m push to address the shortage of Irish teachers in the education system. Under the scheme, the first of two new Irish-medium teacher education programmes will be delivered this year by Mary Immaculate College followed by the Marino Institute of Education in 2019.Éanna Ó Caollaí has the details.

Trainee teachers who are required to carry out unpaid work in schools as part of their studies are suffering from severe financial difficulties , a new survey indicates. The poll of more than 3,000 student teachers indicates that close to half - 42 per cent - consider dropping out due to financial pressures. Carl O’Brien reports.

Trinity College Dublin has decided to drop plans for the introduction of supplemental examination fees after a campaign led by students, which said the proposal was unfair and undemocratic. Éanna Ó Caollaí reports.

Up to 1,300 jobs are set to be created over the next two years after a new phase in the development of DIT’s campus at Grangegorman received the green light. Construction of two substantial academic buildings on the campus is set to begin shortly with the aim of having them ready for September 2020. Carl O’Brien reports.

Thousands of Irish students who have spent time working in the US on a J-1 visa in the past four years could be eligible for a tax refund of about €645, according to specialists. Read the report here.

During the recent Seanad debate on the motion to allow 16-year-olds to vote in local and European elections, Senator Marie Louise O’Donnell passionately argued against the motion, telling teenagers “I would suggest that you stay away from politics and I would suggest you get on with your creative and imaginative lives.” The world desperately needs the energy, work ethic and ambition that young people have to offer, writes Jade Wilson.