Stripe jobs boost for Dublin, €50m hotel sale, home ownership rates and 5G explained

Business Today: the best news, analysis and comment from The Irish Times business desk

Stripe, the online payments company founded by Patrick and John Collison (above), intends to create hundreds of additional engineering jobs in Dublin after securing an e-money licence from the Central Bank

Stripe, the online payments company founded by Patrick and John Collison (above), intends to create hundreds of additional engineering jobs in Dublin after securing an e-money licence from the Central Bank

 

Stripe, the online payments company founded by Patrick and John Collison, intends to create hundreds of additional engineering jobs in Dublin after securing an e-money licence from the Central Bank. Dublin is the company’s fastest-growing office and its first international engineering hub with over 150 employees.

A group that includes US cable television tycoon John Malone has agreed a deal to buy the five-star Powerscourt Hotel in Enniskerry from a company controlled by Tetrarch Capital for more than €50 million. The MHL consortium already has a portfolio of 11 properties, which includes the Westin and Intercontinental hotels in Dublin city.

Virgin Media Television viewers will soon be shown different ads depending on who they are and where they live under a partnership between Virgin and rival Sky.

Contrary to perceptions, the rate of home ownership in the Republic corresponds very closely to the international average, a study by the OECD has revealed.

Settlement talks are underway in the marathon case by Sean Quinn’s five adult children denying liability for some €410 million under guarantees of loans advanced by Anglo Irish Bank to Quinn companies. It follows a ruling by the judge that the children cannot pursue claims that their father unduly influenced them to sign the securities and “effectively dictated” to them about the lending.

5G is due to arrive this year promising not just faster downloads but the basis for connecting dozens of devices in the home and even providing the vital link needed for the rollout of autonomous cars. Ciara O’Brien unpicks the reality from the spin and spells out what you really need to know about the upcoming tech wave.

As Apple expands its service offerings, Karlin Lillington warns that amid all the hype we fail to see how bizarre it is for Apple to offer a credit card because tech company (over)reach is now normalised. While the tech giants want us to get excited by what Spielberg will bring to streaming, or the ability to order pizzas via Alexa, Karlin writes: “we, our governments and our regulators need to start paying more attention to the activities of the ringmasters rather than their distracting acts.”