‘Relentless’ set new Republic of Ireland record for crossing Atlantic

Crew from Cork and Dublin completed the Atlantic Challenge in 32 days and 22 hours

The Relentless crew arriving in English Harbour, Antigua, this morning

The Relentless crew arriving in English Harbour, Antigua, this morning

 

Relentless, a crew from Cork and Dublin, have became the fastest rowing team from the Republic of Ireland to traverse the Atlantic. They crossed the finish line in Antigua on Tuesday morning after rowing from the Canary Islands in 32 days 22 hours and four minutes.

The crew of Sean Underwood, Pat O’Connor and Eoin O’Farrell from Cork and Thomas Browne from Dublin were greeted on the dock at English Harbour by a crowd of family and friends and a big group of rowers who had already completed the Atlantic Challenge.

They were hailed by the organisers as the most chilled crew to compete in the race - they played Rocky Road to Dublin as soon as they crossed the finish line in English Harbour, but otherwise were as calm as if they had been out for a training spin.

Relentless had finished sixth in the fastest ever race across the Atlantic and had actually finished faster than the previous fastest time for this race. This year’s winners, The Four Oarsmen, finished in 29 days 14 hours and 34 minutes - the quickest ever row across the Atlantic.

A crew from Northern Ireland, Home to Portrush, finished on Sunday in 31 days eight hours and 57 minutes. They were one place ahead of Relentless.

The most extraordinary performance of the race was that of Mark Slats. The Dutchman, rowing solo, finished fourth in the race, taking 30 days, seven hours and 49 minutes to traverse the 3,000 miles (4,800 kilometres) from the Canaries to Antigua.

The Relentless crew were quick to mention Presentation Brothers College Cork, where Sean and Eoin had learned their rowing. Both are now doctors. O’Connor is a podiatrist and Browne a businessman.

Before they finished they were close to the Antigua coast, but were coming in north of the finish line in English Harbour and had to readjust their course.

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