Swimming ban at south Dublin beaches is lifted

Beaches were shut on Friday following a wastewater overflow at the plant in Ringsend

People in the water at White Rock beach in Killiney, Co Dublin. Photograph: Eric Luke

People in the water at White Rock beach in Killiney, Co Dublin. Photograph: Eric Luke

 

The swimming ban at south Dublin beaches has been lifted following the results of tests on the water quality.

Beaches were shut down to swimmers on Friday for the fourth time this year following another wastewater overflow at the city’s treatment plant in Ringsend.

However, in a statement on Tuesday, Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council said test results were positive and the ban at Seapoint, Sandycove, White Rock and Killiney bathing areas had been lifted. The ban on swimming at the Forty Foot was lifted on Monday.

“Further to receipt of test results from bathing water samples taken on August 10th, the temporary bathing prohibition in place at all remaining locations – Seapoint, Sandycove, White Rock and Killiney bathing areas – has now been lifted,” said the council.

“Please note that although the prohibition for Sandycove has been lifted, results were slightly elevated and require further monitoring and sampling today/tomorrow in accordance with HSE recommendations.

“However, based on a risk assessment carried out by the Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown bathing water team, the predicted risk of current elevated bacteria levels at Sandycove is low.

“Notification signs are being removed at Seapoint, Sandycove, White Rock and Killiney.”

However, the swimming ban is still active at Dollymount beach. Dublin City Council said it was awaiting test results before making a determination as to when to reopen the beach.

“When these results are assessed, and in consultation with the HSE and the EPA [Environmental Protection Agency], a decision will be made on whether to remove the bathing prohibition notices,” a city council spokeswoman said.

“Dublin City Council notes also that there is already a season-long prohibition of bathing in place covering Sandymount and Merrion beaches and this will remain in place, regardless of the results of these most recent samples.”

Seasonal bans in place at Merrion and Sandymount beaches are due to ongoing issues around bacterial levels in the water.