Davy Russell goes to Limerick for day two of Christmas festival

Gigginstown-owned Fury Road has a grade three penalty for contest with an illustrious roll of honour

Davy Russell: novice Fury Road is among four rides for the former champion jockey

Davy Russell: novice Fury Road is among four rides for the former champion jockey

 

Davy Russell is at Limerick for day two of the Christmas action with Fury Road among four rides for the former champion jockey.

Fury Road has to concede weight all round in the featured grade two Lyons Jaguar Novice Hurdle and one certainty is he will have to work a lot harder for this pattern race than his last one.

The Gigginstown-owned novice had a lucrative canter round at odds of 1-25 when last month’s Monksfield Hurdle at Navan cut up to just three runners.

It means Fury Road has a grade three penalty for a contest with an illustrious roll of honour in recent years.

Faugheen (2013,) Martello Tower (2014) and Penhill in 2016 all proceeded to win at the Cheltenham festival.

Lofty standard

Willie Mullins has four of the 10 contenders this time and Vis Ta Loi impressed when winning at Cork last time. Fury Road however looks ready to set a lofty standard.

Mullins’s grade one bumper winner Colreevy should fill a similar role in a later maiden hurdle, especially since she steps up half a mile from her previous effort over flights at Cork.

The champion trainer gives Ciel de Neige a third start in the opening maiden and an official mark of 135 makes the McManus runner difficult to oppose.

Ciel de Neige was doing all his best work in the closing stages of a valuable handicap behind stable companion Janidil at Fairyhouse last time.

Expensive purchase

Gigginstown runs three in the bumper including expensive purchase Mr Lingo for trainer Gordon Elliott.

Bob Lingo’s brother won a point to point in 2017 after which he was bought for £250,000. The fact he hasn’t been seen since suggests things have been far from smooth with him.

In the circumstances, Baptism of Fire, a point winner in April, and a son of Jeremy, could be the answer, on very soft conditions.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.