Paul and Gary O’Donovan take first and second at Cork Regatta

In the women’s pairs Skibbereen’s Niamh Casey and Aine McCarthy were clear winners

World lightweight champion Paul O’Donovan on his way to winning the single sculls at Cork Regatta on Saturday. Photograph: Liam Gorman

World lightweight champion Paul O’Donovan on his way to winning the single sculls at Cork Regatta on Saturday. Photograph: Liam Gorman

 

Paul O’Donovan and Gary O’Donovan showed all their class to take first and second place in the single sculls, but there was a surprise defeat for Mark O’Donovan and Shane O’Driscoll in the pair at Cork Regatta on Saturday.

The UCD lightweight pair of David O’Malley and Shane Mulvaney, who will represent Ireland at the World Under-23 Championships, were emphatic winners in the pairs final. O’Driscoll and O’Donovan, the reigning world champions in the lightweight pair, are trying to prove themselves as a heavyweight pair at international level. They offered no excuses for their defeat. “It just didn’t go our way,” O’Donovan said.

The event was blessed with warm sunshine and Skibbereen fans in the crowd at the National Rowing Centre had other reasons to cheer. Paul O’Donovan rules the single sculls in Ireland, but the performance of Gary in taking second ahead of heavyweight Ronan Byrne of UCC was a talking point. The elder O’Donovan brother continues to have to prove he is the best companion for Paul in the lightweight double - and continues to hit the mark.

In the women’s pairs, the Skibbereen unit of Niamh Casey (21) and Aine McCarthy (36) were surprisingly clear winners, while their clubmate, Denise Walsh, took the women’s single sculls.

Skibbereen and Lee teamed up to win the women’s quadruple and the Ireland under-23 lightweight crew won the men’s equivalent. Cork Boat Club and Trinity won the men’s and women’s coxed fours.

At Henley Women’s Regatta, NUIG’s development coxed four won twice to book their place in a semi-final on Sunday.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.