Chelsea remain in third after Norwich win; GAA dressing rooms to remain closed

The Morning Sports Briefing: Keep ahead of the game with ‘The Irish Times’ sports team

Chelsea’s French striker Olivier Giroud after scoring against Norwich City last night. Photograph: Getty Images

Chelsea’s French striker Olivier Giroud after scoring against Norwich City last night. Photograph: Getty Images

Chelsea continue to lead the race for the Premier League’s top four after their 1-0 win over Norwich last night, an anxious slog against opponents already relegated. Olivier Giroud’s goal was enough to keep them in third place, four points clear of Leicester and Manchester United after playing a game more than their closest rivals. Manchester City’s two-year ban from European competition, imposed by Uefa after it found the club guilty of a serious breach of financial fair play rules, has been lifted by the court of arbitration for sport. The court said City had failed to cooperate with Uefa’s investigations but found that “most of the alleged breaches were either not established or time-barred”. José Mourinho and Jürgen Klopp have strongly criticised the ruling. Tonight there are four Premier League matches including Arsenal versus champions Liverpool at 8.15pm.

The GAA confirmed on Tuesday that most of its indoor facilities will remain closed until further notice on “a risk stratification basis”, as now agreed by the Association’s Covid Advisory Group. Therefore all dressing rooms, club and county gyms will remain closed even as club matches resume this weekend. This weekend will see the first of the live club broadcasts on TG4, which will continue over the coming months with one live game on the Friday night and one live on Sunday afternoon. Wexford and Dublin senior hurling championship are the pick of the first post-lockdown fixtures of 2020. In his column this morning, Sean Moran explains how the Jack Charlton era made the GAA sit up and realise its greatest strength: “The Charlton years paradoxically brought out the GAA’s great strength – its games as modern sports competing with other games without losing their cultural distinctiveness and not some theme park, ring-fenced by anathema.”

The Irish Times
Please subscribe or sign in to continue reading.
The Irish Times

How can I keep reading?

You’ve reached an article that is only available to Irish Times subscribers.

Subscribe today and get the full picture for just €1 for the first month.

Subscribe No obligation, cancel any time.