‘This is a neighbourhood, not a corridor’ says resident opposed to bus lane plan

Mary-Rose Brady: ‘We are going to fight this. We are all up in arms about this’

Anne Graham, CEO of the NTA, at the announcement of phase one of the BusConnects core bus corridors project at the end of last year. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw for The Irish Times

Anne Graham, CEO of the NTA, at the announcement of phase one of the BusConnects core bus corridors project at the end of last year. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw for The Irish Times

 

Residents in south Dublin have said they are “opposed” to losing part of their front gardens to accommodate bus and cycle lanes under the BusConnects project.

Mary-Rose Brady has been living on Kimmage Road Lower for more than 50 years with her husband. She received a letter earlier this week from the NTA informing her part of their front garden could be impacted under the proposed Kimmage to city centre corridor.

“We are totally opposed to it here. This is a neighbourhood, not a corridor and this is what they’re trying to make it into,” she told The Irish Times.

“It’s a residential area and a neighbourhood, they want to make it like Cork Street where the road is right up to the front doors and there’s no room for nothing.”

Ms Brady said she has already made a submission to the NTA in relation to BusConnects.

“We made suggestions to the NTA about building car parks within 10 miles of the city and let drivers’ parking fees entitle them to a free ride on the commuter bus. There would be no need for compensation or anything.

“We are going to fight this. We are all up in arms about this, and very much the younger crowd are too.”

Dr Finbar O’Mahony, who lives on Terenure Road East, also received a letter from the NTA. His property would be affected under the Rathfarnham to city centre corridor.

“I’m rather surprised they’re talking about extending the bus corridors here because we’ve already had a bus corridor on both sides,” he said.

“Certainly the footpath was reduced in size by almost 50 per cent about 30 years ago. So I don’t see any need for an extension from Brighton Road to Rathgar Village.”

Dr O’Mahony said he believes a number of properties on the road are protected structures and therefore unsure if the gardens could be altered.

“I think these are preserved buildings, they are protected structures and I don’t think anything should really encroach on them at this stage if you have interest in the heritage of the city. . .This is not nimbyism, this is basically do you have respect or not for the built environment,” he said.

The NTA has said protected structures could be subject to compulsory purchase orders but only with approval from An Bord Pleanála.