Dublin businesses call for safer cycling infrastructure in city

Companies eager to see employees given safer commutes, says campaign co-founder

Dublin businesses are coming together to demand safer cycling infrastructure in the city centre for their staff. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw

Dublin businesses are coming together to demand safer cycling infrastructure in the city centre for their staff. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw

 

Dublin businesses are coming together to demand safer cycling infrastructure in the city centre for their staff.

More than 40 companies have teamed up with the Dublin Chamber of Commerce to call for increased Government spending on segregated cycle lanes and better bike facilities in the capital.

The companies include Arthur Cox, Mason Hayes & Curran, Sam’s Bar, the Dawson Hotel, Ervia, Griffith College, DIT and Horizon Blue Talent Consulting.

Graeme McQueen, Dublin Chamber’s head of public affairs said companies are seeing a sharp increase in the amount of staff commuting to work by bike.

“They are becoming increasingly aware of the need for better, safer cycling facilities in the city,” Mr McQueen said.

“Since 2008, the number of people commuting into the city has doubled to more than 12,000 every day. However, for the most part, this progress does not come as a result of good cycling infrastructure, but rather in spite of it. This needs to change.”

Mr McQueen said feedback to the Chamber indicates thousands more would like to cycle but are too afraid to get on their bikes.

“The need for a proper cycling plan in Dublin is clear. Such plans have been central to cycling becoming so popular in cities in Denmark and the Netherlands,” Mr McQueen added.

“Currently, around 6 per cent of work commutes in Dublin are made by bike. In Copenhagen, that number exceeds 40 per cent.”

Dublin Chamber of Commerce is due to send a letter to the Minister for Transport Shane Ross highlighting the need for the Greater Dublin Area Cycle Network Plan, which was launched in 2013, to be implemented.

Stephen McManus, co-founder of CyclingWorks campaign said “people who commute to work by bike are happier, healthier, more likely to arrive on time and less likely to take sick days”.

“Companies are increasingly aware of these benefits and also realise that the cost of providing parking spaces can be prohibitive. So it makes sense that companies are now eager to see their employees being provided with a safer commute which can be provided through increases investment in infrastructure.”