What is this jellyfish with nasty-looking stingers? Readers’ nature queries

Ethna Viney on rove beetles, moths and a damselfly

We saw this striking blue jellyfish on the shore in Clew Bay. It had some nasty-looking stingers underneath. I'm glad I didn't find it while swimming. – Kirstin McDonagh, Westport, Co Mayo

It’s the blue jellyfish, Cyanea lamarckii, the same family as the brown lion’s mane, which is twice the size. The blue jellyfish grows to 30cm diameter and has eight groups of 40-60 tentacles underneath the bell. The stinging cells are on the upper surface of the bell.

I spotted this furry productive moth on my shed wall recently. Regardless of identity, she is certainly a little beauty for distracting 40-odd GPs amid Covid shenanigans. – Dr Peig Costello, Cloughjordan, Co Tipperary
That is the pale tussock moth laying eggs.

The first time I saw this insect was last summer, when it was flying. I saw it again this year on a bay leaf. Is it a damselfly? – Michael D'Arcy, Terenure, Dublin 6W
It's the male beautiful jewelwing damselfly. Biological records show it plentiful in this country but confined south of a line from Dublin to Westport.

I found this insect in my new tunnel. It's about the size of a queen bee; what is it? – Mary Corless. Claremorris, Co Mayo
It's a rove beetle, Stephylinus caesareus, of the same family as the black scorpion-like devil's coach horse. It seems to be rare – there is only one report in the biological records.

My granddaughter Mia spotted this beautiful creature. and wanted to know what it was. – Marie Hannon, Bray, Co Wicklow
It's the green silver lines moth, a long name for such a small moth.

There were several requests to identify the brindled hoverfly. This photo was sent by Brendan Smyth, Glenageary, Co Dublin.

Ethna Viney welcomes observations and photographs at Thallabawn, Louisburgh, Co Mayo, F28 F978, or by email at viney@anu.ie. Include a postal address