Irish medtech firm Diaceutics teams up with IT giants on AI project

Co Louth company announces diagnostic testing collaboration with Intel and Lenovo

Diaceutics chief executive Peter Keeling: “We are excited to be moving the boundaries with this highly innovative technology.”

Diaceutics chief executive Peter Keeling: “We are excited to be moving the boundaries with this highly innovative technology.”

 

Dundalk-based medtech firm Diaceutics has teamed up with computer chip manufacturer Intel and hardware maker Lenovo to use artificial intelligence (AI) to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients.

The company, which works with pharmaceutical firms on diagnostic testing and data analytics to bring more personalised medicine to patients, is to use AI to see whether patients can be grouped according to diagnostic test information. It is confident that being able to manage this will lead to better treatment and outcomes for patients with similar characteristics.

“Artificial intelligence can make a very strong and positive impact on precision medicine and we are excited to be moving the boundaries with this highly innovative technology,” said Diaceutics chief executive Peter Keeling.

As part of the collaboration, a number of biomarkers covering a variety of tumours and cancer types will be input into a machine-learning programme that will then seek to identify similarities and patterns within the testing data.

Patient outcomes

“AI allows us to look at the complete patient journey from initial testing and diagnosis, and on to the ultimate treatment. The result will be significantly better patient testing and likely improved patient outcomes, such as longer cancer survivorship rates,” said Mr Keeling.

Diaceutics last year signed a multimillion-euro deal with BioReference, the third-largest full-service clinical diagnostic laboratory in the US, to acquire data that will help pharmaceutical companies roll out new drugs.

The company, which has seen revenues jump 60 per cent each year over the past three years, expects the market for its services, which help companies better understand testing for biomarkers and specific illnesses, will be worth €4 billion by 2020.