The good news is that Turn the Tide on Plastic is currently ranked third overall and we’ve worked really to get here over the past two weeks.

Clear highlight of the last week was catching back up to the front-runners

Annalise Murphy on board Turn the Tide on Plastic  during Leg 6 to Auckland

Seven days in, I still have a love-hate relationship with ocean racing

Turn the Tide on Plastic during the taxing Leg 4 of the Volvo Ocean Race from Melbourne to Hong Kong. Photograph: Brian Carlin/Volvo Ocean Race

Tragedy strikes close to the end of the 6,000 nautical-mile Leg 4 from Melbourne to Hong Kong

Alex Gough on the wheel surfing the waves on board Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag during the leg from Melbourne to Hong Kong. Photograph:  Konrad Frost/Volvo Ocean Race

Becoming becalmed in the doldrums seriously tested my patience on many occasions

The Turn the Tide on Plastic photographed from a drone. Photograph:   Brian Carlin/Volvo Ocean Race

Annalise Murphy: from strong winds and rough seas to total calm and warm water

Our skipper, Dee Caffari, reckons we’ve proven our ability to match the best boats in the fleet in the early stages of the race. Photograph: Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race

New Year starts with departure from Australia and the start of a 6,000-nautical-mile hike to Hong Kong

Annalise Murphy and her crew onboard Turn the Tide on Plastic arrive into Cape Town. Photo: Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race

After losing six kilos eating free-dried food, a burger and chips was more than welcome

Annalise Murphy stands on board Turn the Tide on Plastic during day 15 of the Volvo Ocean Race. Photo: Sam Greenfield/Volvo Ocean Race

Freeze-dried food, saltwater hands and talking in my sleep have become the norm

Crew members of Turn the Tide on Plastics take advantage of the rain to have a shower on deck during the second leg of the Volvo Ocean Race from Lisbon to Cape Town. Photograph:  	Sam Greenfield/Volvo Ocean Race

King Neptune came to claim his dues for the first-timers disrespecting his domain

The Turn the Tide on Plastic boat is hit by a wave at the start of leg two of the Volvo Ocean Race from Lisbon to Cape Town. Photo: Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race

Sleeping on saturated pillows has become as constant as the howling winds and waves

Annalise Murphy on board  Turn the Tide on Plastic during leg one of the Volvo Ocean Race. Photograph:   Jen Edney/Volvo Ocean Race

Getting the first leg out of the way has helped banish doubts I had about undertaking an ocean race

Annalise Murphy on board Turn the Tide on Plastic during Stage One  of the Volvo Ocean Race from Alicante to Lisbon. Photograph: Jen Edney/Volvo Ocean Race

When the boat is fully powered up in 30 knots of wind on the Atlantic it’s pretty amazing

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