Una Mullally: A collection of gay PR machines is not a Pride parade

An end to the corporate presence at Pride would be a welcome development

Una Mullally: ‘In recent years, it has been heartening to see a younger LGBTQ+ generation take up the mantle of interrogating the logic and ethics of acceptability politics and corporate nonsense.’ Photograph: Dara Mac Donaill/The Irish Times

Una Mullally: ‘In recent years, it has been heartening to see a younger LGBTQ+ generation take up the mantle of interrogating the logic and ethics of acceptability politics and corporate nonsense.’ Photograph: Dara Mac Donaill/The Irish Times

This weekend is meant to be the biggest in the LGBT calendar in Ireland, the culmination of the Dublin LGBTQ+ Pride festival in a huge march through the city centre.

Pride is also an important revenue stream for bars, performers, DJs, drag queens, club promoters, and the lively network that makes up the capital’s gay scene. When the lockdown came into effect, among the first to innovate were Ireland’s drag queens, hosting shows and drag competitions online, selling tickets and asking for viewer support to keep them afloat. The gay scene is an ecosystem that almost completely exists in a live environment, and as we know busy bars that don’t have the resources to pretend to be restaurants, nightclubs, and festivals have been shuttered for the foreseeable. 

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