DUP deal with Conservatives will ‘end in tears’, Adams predicts

Sinn Féin leader says some progress made in talks to restore Northern Executive

Sinn Féin president Gerry Adams said: “As any student of Anglo-Irish politics will tell, it will all end in tears as all of unionism’s dalliances with the British have.” File photograph: Stephen Collins/Collins Photos

Sinn Féin president Gerry Adams said: “As any student of Anglo-Irish politics will tell, it will all end in tears as all of unionism’s dalliances with the British have.” File photograph: Stephen Collins/Collins Photos

 

Sinn Féin president Gerry Adams has predicted the DUP’s arrangement to keep the minority Conservative government in power in the UK will end badly.

He told the Dáil on Wednesday the DUP believed its position had been enhanced by the recent deal.

“But as any student of Anglo-Irish politics will tell, it will all end in tears as all of unionism’s dalliances with the British have,” he added.

Mr Adams said Edward Carson, leader of unionism at the time of partition, had reflected on the fool he was as a puppet, as was Ulster and Ireland, in the political game to get the Conservative party into power.

Mr Adams said some progress had been made in Sinn Féin’s talks with the DUP but there was no real evidence at this time of a willingness on its part to embrace the political institutions in the way required to serve every citizen.

Mr Adams said he had spent many hours in recent months talking to the DUP leadership along with others from his party’s leadership.

Respect, tolerance, equality

He said a solution meant agreeing a process for the implementation of past agreements and building respect, tolerance and equality.

Fianna Fáil leader Micheál Martin said by any objective measure a major crisis point had been reached relating to Northern Ireland.

“No one can be complacent about the future in Northern Ireland,’’ he added.

“It is impossible to miss the fact that the foundations for conflict and division, albeit at a much lower level than in the past, remain in place.’’

Mr Martin said deep poverty and disillusionment remained in marginalised communities which had in the past been exploited by violent groups.

Minister for Foreign Affairs Simon Coveney said the issues under discussion went to the heart of divisions in society in Northern Ireland and agreement on them was always going to be challenging.

“However, it remains my firm belief that the parties can reach an agreed outcome which sees the implementation of previous agreements and reflects the core principles of the Good Friday Agreement and powersharing itself, namely, partnership, equality and mutual respect,’’ he added.