Third Dublin building site closed due to coronavirus

South Great George’s Street location run by Elliott Group closes after worker tests positive

The company said that ‘all personnel on site have been asked to contact their GPs to undergo testing.’ File photograph: Bloomberg

The company said that ‘all personnel on site have been asked to contact their GPs to undergo testing.’ File photograph: Bloomberg

 

Another Dublin building site has closed due to coronavirus, the third in a week.

A worker tested positive for Covid-19 at the site operated by the Elliott Group on South Great George’s Street.

The company said: “All personnel on site have been asked to contact their GPs to undergo testing. The site will undergo an electrostatic decontamination in the morning and it will be certified clean for return to work.

“We await further direction from the HSE and we will work closely with the authorities to ensure that the wellbeing of all personnel, staff and the general public is protected. We wish the person affected a speedy recovery.”

On Thursday, another building site, in Grangegorman, north Dublin, had to close due to a confirmed case of coronavirus.

The East Quad site in Grangegorman, a joint venture set up between John Sisk & Son and Spanish construction company FCC, was shut down and a deep clean was scheduled to take place there.

It came after a building site operated by John Paul Construction on Townsend Street in Dublin 2 was forced to close on Monday.

Up to 30 cases confirmed

The State’s acting chief medical officer Dr Ronan Glynn said that the Grangegorman site was closed as a precautionary measure because a person who had worked on both sites tested positive for the disease.

Dr Glynn said that between 25 and 30 confirmed cases had been confirmed at the cluster linked to the Townsend Street site and that the Grangegorman site was closed because of a link with the city centre site. He did not believe there was a second cluster there.

“That site is closed out of an abundance of caution pending further risk assessment by the public health team,” he told the National Public Health Emergency Team briefing at the Department of Health on Thursday.

Dr Glynn said that 25 to 30 cases in any setting is “substantial and demonstrates how this disease can spread given any opportunity”.

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