Vehicles being driven by two unaccompanied learner drivers seized

Vehicles taken by gardaí under new legislation which came into force before Christmas

Gardaí said Naas Roads Policing were conducting a checkpoint on Monday night and found a motorist driving on a learner permit, with no L-plates displayed and not accompanied by a qualified driver.

Gardaí said Naas Roads Policing were conducting a checkpoint on Monday night and found a motorist driving on a learner permit, with no L-plates displayed and not accompanied by a qualified driver.

 

A learner driver caught doing 172 kph on a midlands motorway has been stopped for driving unaccompanied as well as speeding and the vehicle which was being driven has been seized.

In a Tweet on Tuesday afternoon gardaí said the driver was stopped just south of Portlaoise.

“Vehicle seized for driving unaccompanied and speeding ticket to follow in post,” it said.

Another unaccompanied learner driver speeding at 115km/h in a 50km/h zone was arrested on Monday night and gardaí seized the vehicle.

Gardaí said Naas Roads Policing were conducting a checkpoint on Monday night and found a motorist driving on a learner permit, with no L-plates displayed and not accompanied by a qualified driver.

Gardaí said the driver was arrested and subsequently charged and the vehicle was seized.

The Clancy Amendment, which penalises car owners who knowingly allow their vehicles to be used by unaccompanied learner drivers, came into force before Christmas.

Legislation previously allowed for penalties to be imposed on unaccompanied learner drivers but not on the owners of the vehicles.

Minister for Transport Shane Ross said he anticipated the Clancy Amendment would have a “serious impact on driving culture in this country”.

The amendment is named after mother and daughter Geraldine and Louise Clancy who were killed on December 22nd, 2015, when unaccompanied learner driver Susan Gleeson lost control of her car in Co Cork.