Róisín Ingle: We’ve started new Lockdown Eve traditions. Like Christmas Eve, only with more dread

To question Nphet feels unpatriotic. To not question doesn’t feel right either

Lockdown Eve: Might as well make something of the day when all our beloved old traditions are being decimated. Photograph: Paul Faith/AFP/Getty Images

Lockdown Eve: Might as well make something of the day when all our beloved old traditions are being decimated. Photograph: Paul Faith/AFP/Getty Images

We started some new traditions in my family last week. Traditions we’ll do every Lockdown Eve. It’s like Christmas Eve only with more dread than excitement. Like Christmas Eve but you are not allowed to go to midnight mass, should you be that way inclined. Like Christmas Eve but instead of queuing at the posh delicatessen for the expensive cheese you only buy once a year, you queue up for toilet paper and tins of chickpeas. Maybe this Lockdown you’ll actually get around to making that famous chickpea stew, the one broke the Internet. Lockdown Eve, like Christmas Eve only less magical, the novelty of pandemic living having worn very thin. We know too much now, our fingers firmly on the pulses.

Even if and when we open up briefly again before Christmas, the festivities are effectively cancelled

We started new traditions for Lockdown Eve because we knew this was not the last one. Might as well make something of the day when all our beloved old traditions are being decimated. Halloween is about to arrive like a box of damp fireworks and Christmas is gearing up to be a pale imitation of the real thing. So what’s the point? Even if and when we open up briefly again before Christmas, the festivities are effectively cancelled. But there will be more Lockdown Eves to mark. Might as well make them count. They are more real now than the holidays we can’t replicate. So we booked a table outside a local sushi restaurant for that night. Shivering over sushi. Another Lockdown Eve tradition locked down.

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