Dome envy, a Dutch holiday experiment and the priciest cities in which to rent

Planet Business: Just another ‘array of challenges’

 The Black Dog Restaurant and Bar in Chester, England, is using transparent domes  to protect its customers, following the country’s  easing of restrictions.  Photograph: Oli Scarff/AFP

The Black Dog Restaurant and Bar in Chester, England, is using transparent domes to protect its customers, following the country’s easing of restrictions. Photograph: Oli Scarff/AFP

 

Image of the week: Cold open

There was a chill in the April air as England reopened for outside hospitality (and non-essential retail and personal services) on Monday, but in the Black Dog Restaurant and Bar in Chester, in the northwest, the owners have found an inspirational way for customers to protect themselves against the elements while still, ostensibly, being outdoors: massive transparent domes. They’re futuristic and pragmatic, what’s not to like? Doubtless various authorities here will probably find a reason why they can’t be planted all over the paving stones of Ireland in the vicinity of a functioning bar and kitchen, but still... it’s good to have aspirations. These are, frankly, the only bubbles we should keep in our post-pandemic world.

In numbers: Holiday experiment

25,000
Dutch people who applied for a Covid-era “test” holiday in Greece backed by the government of the Netherlands.

189
Dutch tourists who were chosen to enjoy eight days of sunshine and relaxation at a beach resort on the Greek island of Rhodes. They had access to the pool, restaurant and other facilities of the beach-front Mitsis Grand Hotel, but that was it.

€399
Price they paid for the pleasure, along with regular Covid tests. An absolute bargain, even if they had to settle for a view of the Aegean Sea and couldn’t even dip their toes in it.

Getting to know: Alessandra Galloni

Alessandra Galloni, next editor-in-chief of Reuters News, is the first woman to lead the worldwide news agency in its 170-year history, with the London-based Rome native fighting off both external and other internal competition for the top job. A speaker of four languages, who began her career at the Reuters Italian-language news service, Galloni has degrees from Harvard University and the London School of Economics and racked up a 13-year stint at the Wall Street Journal – reporting from London, Paris and Rome – before returning to the profitable Reuters News, which comprises about 10 per cent of the revenue of parent group Thomson Reuters. “It is an honour to lead a world-class newsroom full of talented, dedicated and inspiring journalists,” Galloni said. “Galloni takes the helm as the news agency faces an array of challenges,” said Reuters, as it announced her appointment.

The list: World-beating rents

“Global mobility expert” ECA International has published a new ranking of the most expensive cities for overseas workers to rent a property. Dublin was fifth in Europe, naturally, but this was the eclectic global top five.

5. San Francisco. An impressive performance for a city with so many insane hills.

4. London. The European number one is yet to feel the full effects of the pandemic shift to remote working, according to ECA.

3. Tokyo. Rents in the Olympic city took bronze in this list.

2. New York. Despite a much reported abandonment by its richer occupants, rents in New York remain beaten only by those in one other city, and the gap is closing.

1. Hong Kong. Rents have fallen in Hong Kong due to the pandemic and political tensions, but it’s still the most expensive place for a worker from abroad to rent a property.

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