C&C challenged, an ‘abyss’ in the North, and Joe Biden’s tech agenda

Business Today: the best news, analysis and comment from The Irish Times business desk

C&C Group was challenged by the Irish accounting watchdog over a €47.6 million coronavirus-related financial charge it booked last year. Photograph: iStock

C&C Group was challenged by the Irish accounting watchdog over a €47.6 million coronavirus-related financial charge it booked last year. Photograph: iStock

 

Cider and beer maker C&C Group was challenged by the Irish accounting watchdog over the €47.6 million coronavirus-related financial charge it booked last year, reports Joe Brennan. The challenge related to the timing of the charge, which was taken for a period before the World Health Organisation declared a global pandemic.

Dominic Coyle has details of good news for a Galway medtech company that has raised a cool $25 million for a device designed to provide relief for people suffering for a chronic runny nose. Cantillon also has some thoughts on the development.

Davy Stockbrokers has upgraded its growth forecast for the Irish economy on the back of better-than-expected multinational exports, writes Eoin Burke-Kennedy. The broker notes however that the impact of fresh Covid restrictions is likely to delay recovery in the first half of the year.

The North is facing an “abyss” once the Brexit “grace period” on imports from Britain ends unless action is taken, one of its major haulage companies has warned. Freya McClements reports on the growing concerns within the sector.

The corporate rescue process of examinership saved close to 600 jobs last year across nine in companies, according to figures compiled by professional services firm Baker Tilly. Joe Brennan has the details on that.

Joe also reports on AIB’s deputy chairman, Brendan McDonagh, deciding to withdraw his candidacy for the position of chairman of the banking group.

The pay bill for the 10 highest paid presenters at RTÉ rose to €3.2 million in 2019, up from just above €3 million in 2016, according to figures published by the State-owned broadcaster on Wednesday afternoon. Laura Slattery has that story.

With Joe Biden celebrating his first day as president of the US, Karlin Lillington is hoping that the new administration will prioritise its handling of the technology sector. Think, she writes, of everything that has happened over the last four years.

As lockdown persists along with the effects of festive excess, Ciara O’Brien takes a timely look at the best of the fitness technology out there that might help us to stay in shape. She also reviews Microsoft’s challenge to Apple’s Airpods, the Surface Earbuds.

In our Innovation section, Chris Horn considers touchless technology, outlining how Covid-19 is fuelling a boom in the development of such solutions.

Frank Dillon looks into the idea of start-up thinking, asking how it could be used positively in the public sector. What if employees with an appetite for challenge could be sought out and encouraged to experiment, for example?

And finally, Olive Keogh profiles the remaining nine finalists in three categories within this year’s Innovation Awards. The winners will be chosen by a panel of judges chaired by Chris Horn.

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