John Delaney elected to Uefa Executive Committee

FAI chief executive can expect to earn well in excess of €100,000 in his new role

  John Delaney finished ahead of several of the European game’s most influential players in the poll. Photograph: Donall Farmer/Inpho

John Delaney finished ahead of several of the European game’s most influential players in the poll. Photograph: Donall Farmer/Inpho

a
 

John Delaney has been successful in the Uefa Executive Committee election with the FAI’s chief executive gaining 48 votes to finish second behind Karl-Erik Nilsson of Sweden in the poll of national federation representatives in Helsinki.

Even with the 55 associations all voting and each having a number of ballots to cast, Delaney’s total was high and he finished ahead of several of the European game’s most influential players including former Manchester United chief executive David Gill and veteran Dutch administrator Michael van Praag, previously a Uefa vice-president who ran for the presidency of Fifa last year.

Former Poland star Zbigniew Boniek finished fourth with 45 votes in the ballot, in which a total of eight places were up for grabs with Servet Yardimci of Poland taking the last seat with 34 votes.

Delaney becomes the first Irish member of the influential governing body of the European Federation since the retirement of Des Casey back in 2002. The presence of an official from a particular national association is generally seen as a good thing for the game in that country with considerable spoils to be carved up.

The commitment involved might still prompt fresh criticisms of his salary at the FAI, however, with Casey having said previously that Uefa took up to 100 days of his time each year. The organisation is much changed in the intervening years but there will be a great many meetings, games, tournaments and other events to attend and it this is bound to impact on his day job.

Delaney can expect to earn well in excess of €100,000 in the new role, which is for a four year term, but it is unclear whether he intends to waive any part of his salary with the association here. He has previously justified the size of it by saying he earns every penny because he works so hard for it. “It is a 24/7 job, weekends as well,” he told The Sun a couple of years back.

a
The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.