Patrick Day dies aged 27 due to head injuries in Conwell fight

American fighter was knocked out in 10th round of super welterweight fight on Saturday

Patrick Day, right, lands a punch on Charles Conwell during the third round of their super welterweight fight on Saturday in Chicago. Photograph: Dylan Buell/Getty Images

Patrick Day, right, lands a punch on Charles Conwell during the third round of their super welterweight fight on Saturday in Chicago. Photograph: Dylan Buell/Getty Images

 

Boxer Patrick Day has died at the age of 27 after sustaining head injuries in his fight in Chicago on Saturday, promoter Lou DiBella has confirmed.

Day was knocked out in the 10th round of his bout against Charles Conwell and subsequently underwent brain surgery.

DiBella said in a statement on his website: “Patrick Day passed away today, succumbing to the traumatic brain injury he suffered in his fight this past Saturday, October 12, at the Wintrust Arena in Chicago, IL.

“He was surrounded by his family, close friends and members of his boxing team, including his mentor, friend and trainer Joe Higgins.”

Day had previously been knocked down twice in the contest before succumbing again to a left hook midway through the 10th round.

He was treated on the canvas for several minutes before being removed from the ring on a stretcher, and underwent surgery that night.

Earlier, Conwell wrote an emotional letter on Instagram praying for Day’s recovery and revealing he had considered quitting the sport.

DiBella’s statement added: “He was a son, brother, and good friend to many. Pat’s kindness, positivity and generosity of spirit made a lasting impression with everyone he met.

“Patrick Day didn’t need to box. He came from a good family, he was smart, educated, had good values and had other avenues available to him to earn a living.

“He chose to box, knowing the inherent risks that every fighter faces when he or she walks into a boxing ring. Boxing is what Pat loved to do.

“It’s how he inspired people and it was something that made him feel alive.”

DiBella also discussed how the sport of boxing might respond to Day’s death.

“It becomes very difficult to explain away or justify the dangers of boxing at a time like this,” he said.

“This is not a time where edicts or pronouncements are appropriate, or the answers are readily available. It is, however, a time for a call to action.

“While we don’t have the answers, we certainly know many of the questions, have the means to answer them, and have the opportunity to respond responsibly and accordingly and make boxing safer for all who participate.

“This is a way we can honour the legacy of Pat Day. Many people live much longer than Patrick’s 27 years, wondering if they made a difference or positively affected their world.

“This was not the case for Patrick Day when he left us. Rest in peace and power, Pat, with the angels.”

British promoter Eddie Hearn tweeted: “Devastated to hear the news of the passing of Patrick Day. I met him for the first time last Thursday, what a charming young man with a dream and a smile that lit up the room.

“Our deepest prayers are with his family, his trainer Joe Higgins, Charles Conwell and promoter Lou DiBella.”

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