Minister approves new suite of rules for wild salmon and sea trout fisheries

Angling notes: advice taken from a public consultation process and Inland Fisheries Ireland in relation to 146 rivers in advance of setting out the new legislation

Ronan O’Connor with the first salmon caught in Ireland for 2017 from Careysville Fishery on the Munster Blackwater

Ronan O’Connor with the first salmon caught in Ireland for 2017 from Careysville Fishery on the Munster Blackwater

 

A suite of regulations and bye-laws governing wild salmon and sea trout fisheries in Ireland which came into effect from January 1st, 2018, have been approved by the Minister for Inland Fisheries, Sean Kyne.

The Minister had received management advice from a public consultation process and Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) in relation to 146 rivers in advance of setting out the new legislation. Over 130 submissions were considered as part of the public consultation.

This was based on the scientific assessment of the current status of stocks carried out by the independent Standing Scientific Committee on Salmon which comprises of scientists from a range of organisations.

Management advice, supported by scientific assessment of rivers/estuaries/harbours, is that: some 42 rivers should be open, as a surplus of fish has been identified in these rivers; 36 rivers should be classified as open for “catch and release” angling and 68 rivers should be closed, as they have no surplus of fish available for harvest.

Minister Kyne said: “In all, 78 rivers will open for angling activity in 2018 and this will provide opportunities for all to share this important natural resource on a sustainable basis. I asked IFI to carry out a full review of the ‘catch and release’ element of fisheries management policy ahead of the 2018 season and this has resulted in an additional 12 rivers open on a ‘catch and release’ basis which otherwise would have been closed.”

Summary of main changes: Dundalk: Glyde – catch and release; Dee – closed to 30 April/catch and release from May 1st; Wexford: Slaney – closed to April 30th/catch and release from 1 May; Kerry: Ferta – catch and release; Inny – catch and release.

Bangor: Glenamoy – Open; Shramore – catch and release; Ballyshannon: Eske – catch and release; Owenwee (yellow) – catch and release; Letterkenny: Owenea/Owentocker – catch and release; Gweedore (Crolly) – catch and release; Tullaghobegley – catch and release; Leannan – closed to 30 April/catch and release from May 1st.

Waiting for first salmon

I recall standing on Four Masters Bridge on a very cold New Year’s morning watching scores of anglers on both sides of the river all plying for the first bar of silver to grab their worm.

Inevitably, opening day would yield a fresh run salmon and news of the capture would immediately circulate around the country via TV, radio and national newspapers, all anxious to record the capture.

The fish was then purchased by a local restauranteur in Bundoran, served that evening to invited guests and the proceeds forwarded to charity.

Thereafter, signs of slippage on the Drowes began with the first fish caught in the first week, then second week and on into February. By this time, more and more fisheries were opening around the country.

As mentioned in last week’s column, Neil O’Shea caught the first salmon of 2016 on January 17th on Lough Currane and last year it was February 1st before Ronan O’Connor claimed the distinction on the River Blackwater at the Careysville Fishery.

Hopefully, there may be news of a first salmon in next week’s column!

Empty chairs at review

This unprecedented step has been taken because of the alleged bias shown against trout anglers and their representatives since the start of the review process, according to a press release issued by Tafi and Nara.

The chairman of Irish Federation of Pike Angling Clubs, John Chambers, said: “The policy review will continue with two empty chairs at the table.”

Swords agm postponed

angling@irishtimes.com

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.