How do you say ‘backstop’ and ‘influencer’ as gaeilge?

Burqa, body shaming, single-use plastic, craft beer, hard border and pay gap some of the latest additions to English-Irish dictionary

Focusing on the biggest stories dominating   news, the   dictionary has introduced a whole series of vocabulary and expressions to help Irish speakers continue their discussion around issues such as the UK’s withdrawal from the European Union   as Gaeilge. Photograph: Brian Lawless/PA

Focusing on the biggest stories dominating news, the dictionary has introduced a whole series of vocabulary and expressions to help Irish speakers continue their discussion around issues such as the UK’s withdrawal from the European Union as Gaeilge. Photograph: Brian Lawless/PA

 

Cúlstop, teorainn chrua, socrú maidir le tarraingt amach, búrca, náiriú faoin gcorp, cóiríocht éigeandála, géarchéim na ndaoine gan dídean. These are just some of a range of terms that have been introduced into the Foras na Gaeilge English-Irish online dictionary as part of its latest update to include words relevant to ongoing current affairs debates around Brexit, homelessness and the environment.

Foras na Gaeilge, the body responsible for the promotion of the Irish language across Ireland, has announced that it added more than 100 new entries to its English-Irish dictionary focloir.ie website based on current affairs, feedback from users and everyday use of Hiberno-English.

Focusing on the biggest stories dominating the Irish news, the online dictionary has introduced a whole series of vocabulary and expressions to help Irish speakers continue their discussion around issues such as the UK’s withdrawal from the European Union and the homelessness crisis as Gaeilge.

Cúlstop (backstop), teorainn chrua (hard border), teorainn bhog (soft border), socrú maidir le tarraingt amach (withdrawal agreement), Teach na dTeachtaí (House of Commons), ailíniú rialála (regulatory alignment) and socrú custam (customs arrangements) are just some of the terms available to gaeilgeoirs eager to improve their current affairs Irish vocab.

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Other terms introduced into the database include búrca (burqa); náiriú faoin gcorp (body shaming); plaisteach aonúsáide (single-use plastic); cóiríocht éigeandála (emergency accommodation); géarchéim na ndaoine gan dídean (homeless crisis) and duine a chodlaíonn amuigh (rough sleeper).

As part of requests made by website users translations for beoir cheirde (craft beer); gleoiteog (cutie); troid liathróidí sneachta (snowball fight); tionchaire (influencer); smaointeoireacht chriticiúil (critical thinking); uisce súilíneach (sparkling water) and bearna phá (pay gap) have also been added to the site.

The latest Hiberno-English additions to the site include: ní hé is éirimiúla amuigh (he’s not the sharpest tool in the shed); aisteach (quare); sciodar (scutter); bheith dian ar dhuine (to be sore on somebody); praiseach a dhéanamh de run (to make a hames of something).

The update comes as part of ongoing work on the print version of the dictionary where more than 13,000 entries were edited in the last year. Entries on the website have also been improved with errors corrected and additional sound and grammar files added to translations.

In 2018, more than 1.9 million users accessed the dictionary online, marking a consistent rise in the numbers using the online English-Irish translator. The new English-Irish Dictionary is available to use free of charge online and as an app and will be available in print form in 2020.

Anyone with further feedback, or suggestions of words for the dictionary, can contact Foras na Gaeilge at aiseolas@focloir.ie.