Fingal council asks DAA for more details on noise impact of new runway

Dublin Airport operator wants restrictions on proposed 3.1km runway to be lifted

A large number of residents in north Dublin are opposed to the plan because of the impact the increased noise would have on their residential amenity.   Photograph: Eric Luke

A large number of residents in north Dublin are opposed to the plan because of the impact the increased noise would have on their residential amenity. Photograph: Eric Luke

 

Fingal County Council has sought additional information from DAA on its application to have restrictions on Dublin Airport’s new €320 million runway lifted.

The runway is due to become operational next year and DAA is seeking amendments to the 2007 planning permission that would allow the 3.1km runway be used between 6am and midnight, and that a noise quota system would be used to dictate the number of night-time flights.

At the end of a 70-page report into the planning application, the council has asked DAA to examine the noise impacts of the easing of restrictions over a 10-15 year period and to allow consideration for potentially the worst-affected locations and include properties closest to the airport.

It has also asked DAA to provide a figure for the number of people who will be “highly annoyed” or “highly sleep-disturbed” by ground and air noise.

Meanwhile, the Aircraft Noise Competent Authority (ANCA), established by the council, has determined that the easing of restrictions will result in a “noise problem”.

The ANCA has stated that the application proposes a situation “where some people will experience elevated levels of night-time noise exposure for the first time, which may be considered harmful to human health”.

The draft regulatory decision triggers a 14-week public consultation and all feedback provided will be considered by the ANCA prior to a final decision.

Clamour

The planning application has attracted 205 submissions. State agencies Tourism Ireland, IDA Ireland, the Irish Aviation Authority and Enterprise Ireland have joined the clamour from the business and aviation sectors to have the restrictions eased.

In addition, 20 separate air carriers serving Dublin Airport have called for the restrictions to be lifted. Ibec, Dublin Chamber and the Irish Exporters Association have also urged a change in the restrictions, along with global logistics firms DHL, FedEx and UPS.

However, a large number of residents in north Dublin are opposed to the plan because of the impact the increased noise would have on their residential amenity.

They have been joined by a number of politicians including Minister for Children Roderic O’Gorman of the Green Party, and MEPs Clare Daly and Ciarán Cuffe.

Mr Cuffe, of the Green Party, told the council that this was a time of climate and biodiversity emergency. “Now is a time to reduce rather than increase the number of flights through Dublin Airport,” he said.

“Surrounding communities have a right to the peaceful enjoyment of their homes, particularly at night-time.”

On the council’s request for additional information, a DAA spokesman said: “A request for further information is a normal part of the planning process and we will be engaging with the planning authorities in relation to this.”