St Pat’s see no hope of return before September as they lay off players and coaches

Inchicore club’s president says they see a possibility that there will be no return in 2020

St Patrick’s Athletic have laid off all playing staff and coaches. Photo: Brian Reilly-Troy/Inpho

St Patrick’s Athletic have laid off all playing staff and coaches. Photo: Brian Reilly-Troy/Inpho

 

Just a day after interim FAI CEO, Gary Owens, had suggested that there might be scope to get the Airtricity League up and running again, St Patrick’s Athletic have temporarily laid off the club’s playing and coaching staff after having concluded that there is little or no chance of a return to competitive football before the autumn.

Owens had been reacting to a government announcement that no gatherings of 5,000 people or more are to be allowed before August 31st, the specifics of which, he suggested, might leave open the possibility for the smaller crowds involved in restarting the league. On Tuesday evening he said that he would be seeking clarification on the matter from the public authorities although he acknowledged that any progress in the situation was dependent on the relaxation of current government restrictions which are due to be reviewed before they expire in May 5th.

The government move on Tuesday, however, seemed to be specifically aimed at clarifying the situation for local authorities who might have been coming under pressure to make decisions on licenses for concerts and similar events. St Patrick’s Athletic, in any case, have taken the position that there is little or no possibility that the league will go ahead again in the middle of June, as currently envisaged, and that as a result they needed to act in order to protect its longer term security.

“Essentially we don’t now believe that there is any prospect that we will be playing football before September,” says club president Tom O’Mahony. “And from listening to what government ministers and public health officials are saying, we believe that we will be very lucky to be back playing then.

“We feel that there is quite a possibility that there will be no more football in 2020 but that if there is, it will be quite late in the year. In the meantime, we have been burning through our budget on the basis of the league returning over the weekend of June 19th but we have come to the conclusion that that is not going to happen and we cannot leave ourselves in a position where we are paying wages through the summer, and perhaps the autumn, until we get to the stage where football does actually return but we have completely exhausted all of our funding. That would do very long term damage to the club.

“We are all devastated to find ourselves in this position,” he continued, “but the hope is that by doing what we are doing now, we are actually protecting the club’s future which will ultimately be of benefit to the players. By laying them off now, they become eligible for the government supports and when the football returns we will then be in a position to resume paying them as normal.

“Of course, people might feel we are being overly pessimistic in taking this action but if that proves to be the case and football returns more quickly than we believe it will then naturally we will move quickly to resume the club’s activities.”

If the club is correct, the extended suspension of league football is likely to have a lasting impact on the league. Most immediately, if it becomes apparent that the June 19th restart is unrealistic then other clubs are highly likely to take similar action in terms of cutting costs in order to preserve any funds they still have.

It would also potentially pose particular problems for the four clubs – Dundalk, Shamrock Rovers, Derry City and Bohemians – that are due to compete in the early rounds of Uefa’s two club competitions. They are currently scheduled to go ahead in mid to late July although there are all sorts of hurdles to be overcome if that is actually to happen, not least the travel restrictions currently being imposed by various countries across Europe.

Uefa’s fixtures working group is due to discuss this and other issues today ahead of an Executive Committee meeting on Thursday.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.