Weekend temperatures to reach 25 degrees in some areas

Warm continental air raises temperatures as HSE issues UV radiation warning

Amy Cooke and Casey O’Driscoll from Kildare enjoying the warm sunshine before the end of the summer break, at Dublins St Stephen’s Green on Friday. Photograph: Alan Betson/The Irish Times

Amy Cooke and Casey O’Driscoll from Kildare enjoying the warm sunshine before the end of the summer break, at Dublins St Stephen’s Green on Friday. Photograph: Alan Betson/The Irish Times

 

The sun is set to shine this weekend before a return to school for most children next week.

Like Friday, Saturday will be warm, particularly in the eastern half of the country where it will reach 20 to 25 degrees, with light breezes. It will be similarly warm in the midlands but cloudier further west with outbreaks of rain in west Munster and parts of Connacht and Ulster, says Met Éireann. In the west, the highest temperatures will reach 17 to 19 degrees.

Sunday will be warm and mainly dry thought it will start off cloudy. It will brighten up with some sunny spells and a few showers may develop. Temperatures will reach 24 or 25 degrees in the east and northeast with light breezes while the west will see highs of 18 degrees.

The positive weather forecast has triggered a Ultraviolet radiation (UV) warning from the Health Service Executive.

UV radiation is the main risk factor responsible for skin cancers and getting too much sun can be harmful whatever the age, the HSE said.

In Ireland, the UV index is usually three or above from April to September, even when it is cloudy. The higher the UV index the greater the risk of skin damage and at three or above skin needs to be protected as much as possible, the statement said.

Prof Anne Marie Tobin, consultant dermatologist at Tallaght University Hospital, said over 11,000 people are diagnosed with skin cancer in Ireland each year.

“This figure is expected to over double by 2045. Thankfully, most skin cancers are preventable by protecting your skin from UV radiation. So our advice is to enjoy the good weather, but take the necessary precautions for you and your family and avoid over-exposure.”

A UV Index tool provided on Met Éireann’s website indicates the level of sun protection required on any given day.

Evelyn Cusack, head of forecasting at Met Éireann said the Global Solar UV index is a scale developed by the World Health Organisation, which measures the UV radiation level at the surface of the Earth, and gives an indication of the potential for skin damage.

“Every day you can check if the UV Index in Ireland is low, moderate, high, very high, or extreme, and we also include advice for the level of sun protection required on any given day. Most important to note is that the peak burn times are between 11am and 2pm,” she said.