Seeing double: Seven sets of twins begin first year at Co Cork school

Six siblings starting at Glanmire Community College attended same primary school

Seven sets of twins -  Harry and Luke Chambers, Sarah and Scott Finn, Alanna and Megan O’Flynn, Mark and David Evans, Nathan and Cephora Kumpaya, Holly and Hannah O’Mahony, Robert and Adam Dyczewski - started  secondary school at  Glanmire Community College on Tuesday.  Photograph: Jim Coughlan.

Seven sets of twins - Harry and Luke Chambers, Sarah and Scott Finn, Alanna and Megan O’Flynn, Mark and David Evans, Nathan and Cephora Kumpaya, Holly and Hannah O’Mahony, Robert and Adam Dyczewski - started secondary school at Glanmire Community College on Tuesday. Photograph: Jim Coughlan.

 

Thousands of students across the country started secondary school on Tuesday, but for one school in Co Cork, this year’s intake could cause some confusion.

Seven sets of twins have joined the ranks at Glanmire Community College, a mixed school with more than 1,000 pupils.

Among the intake of 196 first-year students were Harry and Luke Chambers, and Adam and Robert Dyczewski. The four had previously attended Brooklodge Primary School together.

Three of the sets of twins are moving on from Watergrasshill Primary School inc1uding sports enthusiats David and Mark Evans, with the former planning to sign up for the school hurling team.

Alanna and Megan O’Flynn, and Holly and Hannah O’Mahony have also moved on to the college, with all four saying they are GAA supporters.

The incoming group of first year students is made up of 86 girls and 110 boys. Previously the school had three sets of twins in the one year.

Sarah Finn, an international-level figure skater, and her twin brother, Finn, have also moved on to Glanmire from Riverstown National School. Siblings Nathan and Cephora Kumpaya Mumpuni were also starting at the school on Tuesday.

The college operates under the Cork Education and Training Board (CETB) and is located within the outer suburbs of Cork city. The school opened in 1997 and expanded in 2016, to cater for an increased demand for places.

Ronan McCarthy, the college’s principal, said the school had a “healthy mix” of students from diverse backgrounds including “city kids and farm kids”.

“What we found with the new extension was although it was built [to meet] demand for places, we’re already full again, and could do with more space,” he said.