Make a move to Artane, stay for generations

Dublin 5 neighbourhood a draw for young families seeking forever homes in solid semis

 

What’s so good about it?

This pocket of north Dublin boasts many a famous native, among them actor Brendan Gleeson, singer Brian McFadden and U2’s Larry Mullen Jr (a former member of the Artane boys’ band) but there’s much more to the area than some well-known locals. A settled and mature residential area, Artane boasts the double whammy of established amenities and quietude. Plenty of schools, restaurants and shops (especially Artane Castle Shopping Centre) make up the area. A Penneys, Tesco and Lifestyle Sports on the doorstep are a great convenience for locals. The Dublin 5 enclave is close to Swords, Dublin Airport, Beaumont Hospital and the city centre. Dollymount, the Hole In The Wall Beach and Portmarnock are also accessible. Dart stations at Killester and Harmonstown are another bonus. Locals are also proud of their landmark, the neo-classical Casino – a prime slice of local history.

What’s not so good?

Artane does have its own Family Recreation Centre, but some locals would like to see an outdoor playground in the local area, without having to resort to visiting similar facilities in nearby Donnycarney or Edenmore.

Canoes at a house on Malahide Road, Artane.Photograph by Crispin Rodwell for the Irish Times
Canoes at a house on Malahide Road, Artane. Photograph: Crispin Rodwell/The Irish Times

Where and what to buy?

Well-constructed and nicely proportioned homes are in abundance. Houses, especially in estates like Brookwood and Elm Whitethorn, are in constant demand and sell fast.

No 26 Whitethorn Rise (€390,000, via Gallagher Quigley) is a light and airy three-bed semi-detached close to Artane Castle Shopping Centre.

No 37 Maryfield Drive is a good-sized three-bed terraced house (€335,000, via Delaney Estates) ripe for modernisation.

No 1 Hazelwood Court boasts four bedrooms, two bathrooms and a sunroom at a family-friendly price point (€375,000, via DNG Raheny).

The four-bed, three-bath 32 Brookville Park, meanwhile (€550,000 via Sherry Fitzgerald Killester) has been refurbished and extended to a whopping 190sq m of living space.

Where and what to rent?

As a settled and mature area, rentals are not as bountiful as they are in some suburban spots. Three-bedroom houses are in and around the €2,100-€2,500 monthly mark, depending on condition, while a two-bedroom property has recently been spotted online at €1,875 a month.

Where to eat and drink?

Within the Roundabout pub, Taza Pakistani restaurant (2 Ardcollum Avenue) at the Beaumont end of Artane has been getting rave reviews from locals and restaurant critics. The Goblet (Malahide Road, Artane) in the heart of Artane is also a safe bet for decent pints, casual dining and a live DJ every Saturday night. New Hin Keng Restaurant (25 Malahide Road) is another family-friendly casual dining option.

BrookÕs CafŽ House, Artane.Photograph by Crispin Rodwell for the Irish Times
Brook's Cafe House, Artane. Photograph: Crispin Rodwell/The Irish Times
Taza Restaurant on Ardcollum Avenue, Artane has been getting rave reviews from locals and restaurant critics. Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill
Taza Restaurant on Ardcollum Avenue, Artane has been getting rave reviews from locals and restaurant critics. Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill

If you’re looking for a new local, the Horse and Hound (44 Brookwood Rise) is a brilliant neighbourhood hangout. The Ardlea Inn on Maryfield Avenue is another option.

Who lives there?

Families of several generations’ standing have long enjoyed this area. It’s thought that families make up about a quarter of the local population. MyHome.ie’s research puts the age breakdown in Artane as follows: 16 per cent are under 16; 23 per cent are in the 16-34 age bracket; 20 per cent are 35-49, 14 per cent fall into the 50-64 age ground, and 27 per cent are aged over 65.

Good for families?

With five swimming pools in the area, and active soccer/GAA clubs on the doorstep, there is plenty to do. The Eccles and Arabian gymnastics clubs are popular with local kids.

Among the primary school options in the area and it surrounds are: St David’s CBS (Catholic, boys), St John of God National School (Catholic, girls), St Fiachra’s Junior School in Beaumont (Catholic, mixed), St Mary’s Holy Faith in Killester (Catholic, girls), Scoil Neasáin (Catholic, mixed) and St Brendan’s National School (Catholic, boys). Secondary-school wise, St Mary’s (Catholic, girls), St John of God (Catholic, girls) and Our Lady Of Mercy (Catholic, girls) are popular among Artane families.

Artane is a settled and mature residential area and very popular with families. Photograph: Crispin Rodwell for the Irish Times
Artane is a settled and mature residential area and very popular with families. Photograph: Crispin Rodwell/The Irish Times

Getting there and getting around

The Dart stations (Killester and Harmonstown) will get you into the city centre within 10 minutes. The Malahide Road is serviced well by Dublin bus routes (the 20B, 27, 27B, 27X, 42, 42A, 42B, 43, 104 and 128 all go through the area). As an added bonus, the M50 is nearby.

What do locals say?

“I’ve loved Artane since I was a child when my grandad walked me every morning from his house on Brookwood Drive around the corner to my lovely school, Scoil Neasáin.

I’m now living in the area, and I love that history is repeating itself and my son is cycling the two-minute commute round to Scoil Neasáin. In 2015, when I told a colleague I had bought a house there, she said ‘they’re really solid houses’, which they are. We have lovely high ceilings, and a gated lane at the back of the house which is handy for maintenance work or a shortcut to the shops. We have a fabulous residents’ association in this part of Artane (BRG – Brookwood, Rosemount, Gracefield) who’ve done great work planting flowers, building wooden trains and wishing wells. They’re busy every Monday morning in their Hi-Vis jackets, picking up rubbish.” Ruth Hopkins, teacher

Do you live in Baldoyle, Dublin 13 ? If so, please tell us what it’s like to live there. Do you have a favourite place or a pet peeve in the neighbourhood? Email: homeanddesign@irishtimes.com

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