‘Not getting the points I wanted led to the best year of my life’

Platform: Embrace what comes your way, because, clearly, it was meant to be

Bobbie Hickey: “I remember waking up one morning, lying in bed and realising I have never been this happy before.”

Bobbie Hickey: “I remember waking up one morning, lying in bed and realising I have never been this happy before.”

 

Hello! My name is Bobbie Hickey. I am 19 years old, 100 per cent Irish and about 95 per cent blind (the doctors say I have a whopping 5 per cent sight).

As it is the end of May, college is done and schools are beginning to wrap up the end of another academic year, I thought today we would get out of the kitchen and step out into real life.

A new weekly column by writers with a disability.
A weekly column by writers with a disability.

This time last year, I was among the thousands of students preparing to sit the Leaving Cert exams. I began using all of my free time for study – getting essays written before school even started most days and not closing the books till late most nights. Copious amounts of coffee were drunk, hundreds of biros were used up and I went through a forest worth of paper.

I can remember feeling numb all the time, like my personality had been sucked away and I had been programmed to study 24/7. I sat the exams, feeling alright about most of them, but honestly at that stage all I wanted was for it to be over. On the day, I was finally finished, I was so tired that the feeling of relief only hit me a few days later, when I realised I could get rid of my books and that all that could be done now was to wait.

The summer flew by – I spent my days horse-riding and seeing friends – with not a care in the world. I was confident I had done all that I could and that the universe would realise this and grant me my first-choice wish.

The universe, however, or rather the CAO, did not realise this.

On the day the Leaving Cert results were issued, I arrived at my school ready to discover my fate with my parents – secretly cocky it would go my way. I was mistaken. I had to re-read the results and add the points up a number of times before it finally hit me I did not get the course I wanted. My heart sank as everyone around me tried to convince me that this was okay and that everything happens for a reason – “oh really, what is the reason for this happening? Why has my hard work not paid off?”

I was miserable

For the following week, I was miserable. The harsh reality that I would not be moving into campus accommodation and study what I wanted to was finally starting to settle in. I was told I needed to do a QQI (Quality and Qualifications Ireland) level 5 course in order to re-apply in a year’s time.

At first, the idea of this made me sick.

This was not meant to happen to me – it wasn’t part of my plan. Little did I know, I was about to have one of the best years of my life. The course began in mid-September and by early October, friendships had formed and people were getting into the swing of things. I was getting used to this unexpected chapter of my life with the new experiences and people it was bringing me. I remember waking up one morning, lying in bed and realising I have never been this happy before. I was forming friendships that would last a life-time and gaining skills that would stay with me throughout my career, all while having the best craic ever.

I do not think this happened to me because of my sight, but maybe it did – there is no way we will ever know that.

What we do know, is that it could happen to anyone, and not just in terms of exams. It could happen in any aspect of life. All it is an unexpected turn. In the last year I have learned that everything does happen for a reason, and that life has its own way of working things out.

Just embrace what comes your way, because, clearly, it was meant to be.

PLATFORM SERIES part 2
1) Louise Bruton: The day I started using a wheelchair, a lifetime of self-inflicted pressure lifted
2) Aisling Glynn: There are 847 more accessible taxis in Dublin than west Clare - I just need one
3) Rosaleen McDonagh: Perniciousness of racism and ableism in Ireland still continues
4) Ferdia MacAonghusa: Society thinks disabled people are not humans with rights but problems to be solved
5) Bobbie Hickey: Not getting the points I wanted led to the best year of my life
6) John Cradden: To forge an identity in a hearing world you become ‘Deaf’ rather than ‘deaf’
 

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.