Irish in Britain on Boris Johnson: ‘No one can believe this is happening’

The top stories in Irish Times Abroad this week

Britain’s new prime minister Boris Johnson  outside Number 10 in Downing Street,  London. Photograph: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Britain’s new prime minister Boris Johnson outside Number 10 in Downing Street, London. Photograph: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

 

All eyes have been focused on the UK this week as Boris Johnson became Britain’s new prime minister. There are many things that can be said about the new Tory leader, but his actions have certainly elicited strong opinions among the Irish in Britain. In our most-read story this week, Irish Times Abroad readers share their views on Johnson. Many were in shock at Johnson’s appointment as the country’s new leader: “It’s like we are going back in time. No one can believe this is happening.” Others are hopeful at what he might achieve: “Boris is probably the UK’s best hope restoring a democratic system of government.” During his first speech, Johnson vowed to prove Brexit doubters wrong saying: “Those critics are wrong – the doubters, the doomsters, the gloomsters are going to get it wrong again.” Time will tell, and we’ll keep you updated.

Also popular today is an article from Sheila O’ Callaghan. who is originally from Cork but has lived in Rio de Janeiro since 2015, writing about how being Irish has opened many doors for her abroad. “Being Irish means people want to talk to me and tell me why Ireland makes them happy,” she writes.

Our Extraordinary Emigrant article this week is about the lateHollywood film star Maureen O’Hara who grew up in Ranelagh, Co Dublin. O’Hara had said: “I didn’t take discipline very well. I would never be slapped in school. If a teacher had slapped me I would have bitten her.”

And Mary-Therese Blair, who has a job many of us will envy as a wine writer, has written about life in New Zealand after moving from Blessington, Co Wicklow almost 12 years ago, with her travel tips for visitors to Auckland.

If you would like to contribute by writing your own story, answering a Working Abroad Q&A or sharing your insider’s guide to the city where you live for the Welcome To My Place column, you can contact abroad@irishtimes.com.

You’ll find plenty more stories by and about the Irish diaspora on irishtimes.com/abroad.

To receive this digest to your inbox each week, you can join the free Irish Times Abroad Network here.

Thanks for reading.

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