Fingleton’s advocacy skills under pressure at INBS inquiry

Former chief executive’s line of questioning halted over insufficient notice of document

Michael Fingleton arriving at the Irish Nationwide inquiry at Blackhall Place on Wednesday. Mr Fingleton is representing himself at the inquiry. Photograph: Alan Betson

Michael Fingleton arriving at the Irish Nationwide inquiry at Blackhall Place on Wednesday. Mr Fingleton is representing himself at the inquiry. Photograph: Alan Betson

 

One-time Irish Nationwide Building Society chief executive Michael Fingleton’s advocacy skills came under pressure early in his cross-examination of Darragh Daly, the first witness to give evidence to the inquiry into the lender’s demise.

Fingleton is representing himself at the Central Bank inquiry, which is looking at how he and three other of the former building society’s executives did their jobs in the run-up to the financial crash in 2008. The lender effectively folded the following year.

Daly was head of Irish Nationwide’s credit risk department and says that the building society’s credit committee did not review commercial loans that had fallen into arrears, and only dealt with applications for new advances.

Shortly after Fingleton began quizzing Daly on Wednesday, inquiry chair solicitor Marian Shanley halted one line of questioning because he had not given proper notice of the document on which he wanted to base that part of his examination.

Stop interrupting

Not long afterwards, one of the inquiry’s lawyers stepped in to object to the fact that Fingleton was interrupting Daly and not letting the witness give complete answers to his questions.

Shanley agreed and instructed Fingleton to stop interrupting, although she acknowledged she had given him some leeway on the basis this was his “first engagement” with a witness. For his part, Fingleton agreed to follow the chair’s instructions.

Fingleton resumes his cross-examination on Thursday and will presumably have given the inquiry notice of the documents he wants scrutinised. He has also indicated that he could take most, if not all, of the day to question Daly. There could yet be some robust exchanges.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.