More than 70% unwilling to pay more taxes for better services

Survey from Taxback.com shows dissatisfaction with how Government uses resources

More than a quarter of people surveyed were in favour of paying more taxes and increased spending on public services.

More than a quarter of people surveyed were in favour of paying more taxes and increased spending on public services.

 

More than seven out of ten taxpayers are unwilling to pay more tax even in the event it results in better public services, according to a survey by Taxback. com.

The tax refund specialists asked 1,700 taxpayers throughout the State for their views on taxation, with responses indicating a lack of confidence and satisfaction in the Government’s deployment of resources.

Some 94 per cent said they do not think the Government is doing enough with the current tax intake and that more could be done to benefit the State.

Asked whether they would be prepared to pay more tax if it resulted in better public services, 39 per cent said no on the grounds that “we spend enough on public services”, while a further 33 per cent said it would not “make enough of a difference”.

The remaining 28 per cent were in favour of paying more taxes and increasing spending on public services.

Asked whether both a wealth tax and a new tax rate band ought to be introduced together, 40 per cent rejected the proposal and said a new a new tax rate band should be introduced in isolation.

A further 30 per cent called for a wealth tax in isolation, while another 30 per cent agreed with the proposal to introduce both in tandem.

Taxback.com tax director Barry Flanagan said the figures indicated a desire among taxpayers to “tax the rich”.

“Last year €22.1 billion was collected by Revenue from income tax, levies and USC,” he said. “This was up 4.2 per cent on 2016. But questions on where this money actually goes and whether or not it could be put to better use are always on the public agenda.

“Obviously, the opposition in any government will criticize the current administrations use of public monies, but it would appear that taxpayers themselves also have some criticisms of their own.

“These figures highlight a growing public sentiment for measures to tax the rich in Ireland to a greater extent. Perhaps people hope changes to the tax system will bring greater equality and help reduce the gap between the super-rich and the less well off in the country.”