Foreign financial sector workers eye move to Ireland

Data shows surge in number of professional seeking to relocate to Dublin after Brexit

Job searches from the UK for senior financial roles in Ireland rocketed in the eight-week period after the vote to leave the EU last June

Job searches from the UK for senior financial roles in Ireland rocketed in the eight-week period after the vote to leave the EU last June

 

The number of financial sector workers in Britain and mainland Europe looking to relocate to Ireland surged in the months after the UK voted to leave the European Union, according to data from international jobs site Indeed.

With many major financial institutions considering a move to Dublin on the back of Brexit, Indeed’s analysis reveals that job searches from the UK for senior financial roles in Ireland rocketed in the eight-week period after the vote to leave the EU last June.

UK-based job search for “auditor” roles located in Ireland increased by 55 per cent during this time. Likewise, job search for “financial analyst” and “accountant” jumped by 50 per cent and 46 per cent respectively.

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In addition, searches for “finance controller”, “trader” and “finance analyst”, also rose substantially.

The data shows that Europeans uncertain of their rights to work in the UK following the Brexit vote, are also considering Ireland as an alternative destination. Job search from Europeans looking for work in Ireland for key financial sector roles surged in the weeks after the vote.

Searches for “finance director” roles increased 196 per cent. “Auditor” and “trader” role searches were up 89 per cent and 62 per cent respectively.

“Our research reveals that financial sector professionals are increasingly considering Ireland as an attractive place to work, most likely because of the uncertainties around Brexit,” said Indeed EMEA economist Mariano Mamertino.

“Although nobody can predict the outcome of a “hard Brexit”, Indeed’s job search data suggests jobseekers are already responding to the political uncertainty. This increasing interest is a vote of confidence in the Irish labour market,” he added.