European Union’s chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier attends an EU General Affairs Council in Luxembourg, on October 16, 2018.Photograph: Yves Herman/Reuters

What is a no-deal Brexit? A no-deal Brexit is the term used to describe what happens if the UK leaves the European Union without concluding a withdr(...)

The Parliament Buildings at Stormont in Belfast. A study suggested a united Ireland would reduce national income and living standards in the Republic by up to 15 per cent. Photograph: AFP/Getty Images

Ireland used to fit neatly into Europe’s north-south paradigm; the one where the rich North cocks a snook at the economically backward South. Not any (...)

Prof John FitzGerald’s research suggests that  in the event of a hard Brexit, the only way the North could stay in the EU is by leaving the UK, which opens up the possibility of a united Ireland. Photograph: Aidan Crawley/EPA

Irish reunification would come at a high price for the Republic, reducing income and living standards by as much as 15 per cent, a new study has found(...)

Prof Edgar Morgenroth of DCU says that Irish Water should be investing in major repairs in Dublin. Photograph: Frank Miller

Pumping water from the Shannon to Dublin without repairing leaks “is like throwing money out a window” according to a professor of economics. Prof Ed(...)

Aaron Doyle (8) was among Glasnevin Na Fianna members who visited en mass the public information session hosted by Transport Infrastructure Ireland about the proposed Metrolink project. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw

Will the new Dublin bus corridor go through your front garden? Does the Metrolink threaten your home, or your kid’s GAA or soccer pitch? Or are you c(...)

Currently about 23 per cent of the State’s goods imports comes from the UK either as materials to be used as inputs in Irish business or as consumer goods for the retail sector.

The Republic’s grocery sector could be the hardest hit from Brexit with more than two-thirds of products on Irish supermarket shelves either manufactu(...)

There are a variety of reasons behind why some goods and services are so much more expensive in Ireland. Graphic: Irish Times Graphics

Ireland remains one of the most expensive countries in the EU to live in. And that’s official. According to new figures from Eurostat, the EU’s stati(...)

Mortgages and housing: Central Bank researchers sound a warning and Nesc offers a solution. Photograph: iStock

Central Bank researchers are warning today that if current growth in mortgage lending persists and household incomes rise in line with forecasts, the (...)

On this week’s Inside Business podcast, the team  discusses why Pascal Donohoe should listen to the IMF. Photograph: Reuters

The International Monetary Fund has urged the Government not to cut taxes in the upcoming budget, to protect against future fiscal shocks. On this we(...)

Ireland currently adds 48 cents of excise duty to each litre of diesel purchased compared with 59 cents for petrol.

Increasing the excise duty on diesel to that of petrol would raise more than €500 million for the exchequer while driving down harmful emissions from (...)

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • Next
  • Last »