Doing business with the UK will not just be more difficult for businesses - it will be more difficult for consumers, too

The spectre of a chaotic, no-deal Brexit in October has been catapulted to the forefront of the Irish Government’s planning as a result of the Conserv(...)

The Local Property Tax was brought in to broaden the tax base.

A review of the Local Property Tax is necessary because property values have not been adjusted gradually, a leading economist has said. Edgar Morgenr(...)

Brexit  will mean that Ireland will  no longer be connected to the European electricity network

The Government must consider building “high-cost” post-Brexit projects, including a proposed electricity interconnector to France at a cost of almost (...)

Close to the Border between Dundalk, Co. Louth and Newry, Co. Down. Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill

Can a hard Border on the island of Ireland be avoided in the event of a no-deal Brexit? Probably not, is the answer. Just as the European Commission s(...)

Bare shelves during the Beast from the East  showed how reliant we are on food from the UK. Photograph: Cyril Byrne

Irish supermarkets are very vulnerable to changed circumstance. That has rarely been clearer than it was at the end of February last year when the few(...)

Reunification is ultimately a political issue, of course, but economics is a big part of it.

Depending on which report you believe, uniting the two Irish economies – North and South – could either lead to a dive in living standards in the Repu(...)

More than half of all Irish beef is exported to the UK at present. Photograph: Getty Images

The World Trade Organisation (WTO) has said that there is nothing in its rules that would force either the EU or UK to erect a hard Irish border after(...)

European Union’s chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier attends an EU General Affairs Council in Luxembourg, on October 16, 2018.Photograph: Yves Herman/Reuters

What is a no-deal Brexit?  A no-deal Brexit is the term used to describe what happens if the UK leaves the European Union without concluding a w(...)

The Parliament Buildings at Stormont in Belfast. A study suggested a united Ireland would reduce national income and living standards in the Republic by up to 15 per cent. Photograph: AFP/Getty Images

Ireland used to fit neatly into Europe’s north-south paradigm; the one where the rich North cocks a snook at the economically backward South. Not any (...)

Prof John FitzGerald’s research suggests that  in the event of a hard Brexit, the only way the North could stay in the EU is by leaving the UK, which opens up the possibility of a united Ireland. Photograph: Aidan Crawley/EPA

Irish reunification would come at a high price for the Republic, reducing income and living standards by as much as 15 per cent, a new study has found(...)

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