Samir Nasri banned for six months for Drip Doctors visit

Nasri received 500 millilitres of sterile water containing micronutrient components

Samir Nasri has been banned from football following the investigation into the intravenous drip treatment he received at a Los Angeles clinic. Photograph: Getty Images

Samir Nasri has been banned from football following the investigation into the intravenous drip treatment he received at a Los Angeles clinic. Photograph: Getty Images

 

Former France international Samir Nasri has been banned from football for six months for an anti-doping violation dating from 2016.

Uefa says Nasri has been found guilty of using a “prohibited method” in violation of the World Anti-Doping Code and Uefa’s anti-doping regulations.

A Los Angeles clinic, Drip Doctors, posted a photo of Nasri on its Facebook and Twitter accounts in December 2016, saying it provided him with a drip “to help keep him hydrated and in top health during his busy soccer season.” He was playing at Spanish team Sevilla at the time, on loan from Manchester City.

European football’s governing body, which opened disciplinary proceedings against the Frenchman on March 6th last year, said in a statement on Tuesday afternoon: “The player Samir Nasri has been found guilty for using a prohibited method in accordance with sub-section M2, par. 2 of the Wada (World Anti-Doping Agency) prohibited list.

“In this context, the CEDB (control, ethics and disciplinary body) has decided to suspend Samir Nasri for six months for violation of the World Anti-doping Code and the Uefa anti-doping regulations.

“This decision was taken on February 22nd and is open to appeal.”

Former Arsenal and City playmaker Nasri received 500 millilitres of hydration in the form of sterile water containing micronutrient components on December 26, 2016, while on holiday.

Nasri had reported feeling ill and vomiting before calling a doctor, his Maryland-based former girlfriend Dr Sarabjit Anand, who provided an initial diagnosis. Nasri received treatment in his hotel room and later posed for a photograph with the organisation’s co-founder Jamila Sozahdah that drew publicity.

Wada rules state there is a 50 millilitre infusion limit per six-hour period for active athletes. A request by Sevilla for a retroactive therapeutic use exemption (TUE) for Nasri was refused in February 2017 by Uefa, whose decision was later upheld by the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

Nasri is currently without a club after recently having his contract terminated at Antalyaspor in Turkey.

Guardian services

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