Ukad criticises UK Athletics over report into Alberto Salazar and Mo Farah

Anti-doping body release statement after UK Athletics publish summary of internal

Alberto Salazar and Mo Farah pictured in 2015. Photograph: Adrian Dennis/Getty/AFP

Alberto Salazar and Mo Farah pictured in 2015. Photograph: Adrian Dennis/Getty/AFP

 

Britain’s Anti-Doping body Ukad has criticised an independent review into the way UK Athletics handled issues surrounding its relationship with disgraced running coach Alberto Salazar.

UK Athletics published a 130-page review on Friday which said the governing body had taken reasonable decisions but could have handled the situation better.

In a statement on Saturday, UK Anti-Doping Chief Executive Nicole Sapstead said: “Following the release of UK Athletics’ Independent Report yesterday we note that UK Athletics (UKA) has taken the decision to publish the executive summary of the original internal review that was conducted in 2015 by UKA’s Performance Oversight Committee (POC).

“We have repeatedly requested that UK Athletics share this POC review with us in its entirety as there could be information included that is of interest to us.”

The statement said only an edited summary of the independent review had been shown to Ukad

“We remind UKA that they are bound by the National Anti-Doping Policy. We now call again on UKA to hand over this review in full, including the associated supporting reports and documents.”

The report into how UKA handled its relationship with Salazar, who ran the Nike Oregon Project (NOP) which was home to British four-time Olympic champion Mo Farah between 2011 and 2017, found the board had changed its stance.

Salazar was banned from athletics for four years in October after being found guilty of doping violations following an investigation by the US Anti-Doping Agency (USADA).

He had worked as a consultant to UKA’s endurance programme in 2013 after helping Farah to win the 5,000m and 10,000m at the London 2012 Olympics.

Farah has never been accused of doping violations.

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