GAA confirm competency of Hawk-Eye’s score detection system

Tipp goalkeeper Brian Hogan has twice been caught for points after ball crossed the bar

 

The GAA have confirmed that there is no uncertainty about Hawk-Eye’s ability to determine whether a ball has crossed the bar, as well as whether it has passed between the goalposts.

There has been much comment about the decision of the score detection system to allow Kilkenny’s John Donnelly a point in the 19th minute of Sunday’s All-Ireland final after Tipperary goalkeeper Brian Hogan had apparently caught the ball above the bar, preventing the score.

Donnelly’s shot was caught with 17.48 on the clock but 18 seconds later, referee James Owens whistled and signalled for a review after being alerted to the situation by Dickie Murphy, the Hawk-Eye official on duty. The score was then awarded.

It was the second time in successive matches that Hogan has been caught for a score after appearing to have caught the ball as it was going over the bar.

Bernard Smith, the GAA’s national fixtures and project administrator, explained the procedure.

“From day one the system was designed to track the ball in the area over the bar and between the posts. It doesn’t operate in relation to goals below the bar. There are a series of nine cameras positioned at either end of the ground – an extra one at the Davin goal because the light is poorer there and the background crowd is bigger.”

Protocols surrounding the determination are slightly different in that officials don’t call for Hawk-Eye intervention in situations like Sunday’s but leave it to the score detection system.

If the umpires award a point that hasn’t crossed the bar, Hawk-Eye will contact the referee and annul the score. In those cases, as there is no resulting puck-out, the match must re-start with a throw-in in the middle, as at the start of the match, and all players lined up 15-on-15.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.