GPA welcomes financial estimate for Proposal B

GAA dismissed claims that the option would generate significantly more revenue

GPA CEO Tom Parsons. Photo: Bryan Keane/Inpho

GPA CEO Tom Parsons. Photo: Bryan Keane/Inpho

 

The Gaelic Players Association have responded to the GAA’s estimation that Proposal B in the proposed changes to the football championship structure would only have a very slight impact on gate receipts.

The proposal for a league-based championship has been met with opposition in some quarters and a claim by fixture review task force member Colm O’Donoghue that it would provide the GAA with an extra €10m in revenue.

However, at a meeting with county board treasurers on Thursday, the GAA’s finance department dismissed those claims, saying the three proposals would all offer similar revenues. The news is a boost to those backing Proposal B as revenue differences were one of the main reasons for opposition to it. The proposals will now go forward to a vote at Special Congress next Saturday.

GAA director of finance Ger Mulryan said that Proposal B would be expected to bring in €18.8m, with Proposal A (mixing up provincial championships) estimated to earn €19.3m and Proposal C (qualifiers and Tailteann Cup) would take in €19.6m.

In a statement on Friday morning the GPA also said that the revenues were based on what they believe to be “surprisingly conservative attendance figures.”

“The Gaelic Players Association are delighted that the GAA has confirmed that there will be no meaningful financial impact should Proposal B be backed at Special Congress, with only a 4.1% difference between any eventuality using the GAA’s surprisingly conservative attendance figures,” reads the statement.

“Given that this has been a concern expressed, we’re happy to see it now clarified as it should put delegates’ minds at ease on this matter.

“The decision can now be made solely on the widely acknowledged need for change, fairness to all counties and the development of players and counties across the country.”

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