Una Mullally: Direct provision fits with our history of incarcerating the innocent

We need to stand up once more and demand that direct provision be dismantled

Asylum seeker and activist Ellie Kisyombe still faces out-of-the-blue instructions to move from her accommodation, as she did recently. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw

Asylum seeker and activist Ellie Kisyombe still faces out-of-the-blue instructions to move from her accommodation, as she did recently. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw

It’s only right that the images from the US-Mexican border of children being separated from their parents caused a global uproar. Donald Trump’s American carnage continues. He caused a horrific problem, blamed others, and then wanted credit and absolution when he “addressed” it in a phoney, gaslighting manner.

Social media was full of Irish people outraged at the lack of empathy that has now become the dominant characteristic of the Trump administration, and a morally crumbling America. But in Ireland, our own government is presiding over a system of indefinitely incarcerating asylum seekers of all ages, including children, which is a profitable industry for the private companies running direct provision centres and accommodation.

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