Metro Link set for changes aimed at reducing disruption

Decrease in disruption to Dublin northside sporting facilities and schools targeted

The initial plans for the €3 billion Metro Link project include a proposal to establish a major infrastructural construction site and an underground train station on St Mobhí Road in Glasnevin.

The initial plans for the €3 billion Metro Link project include a proposal to establish a major infrastructural construction site and an underground train station on St Mobhí Road in Glasnevin.

 

The Metro Link project is set to be changed to decrease disruption to a number of sporting facilities and schools on Dublin’s northside.

The initial plans for the €3 billion Metro Link project include a proposal to establish a major infrastructural construction site and an underground train station on St Mobhí Road in Glasnevin.

This would have required the requisition for a period of six years of Na Fianna GAA club’s front pitch and its two all-weather pitches, Home Farm’s soccer pitch and lands used to access Scoil Mobhí and Scoil Chaitríona.

The line, which is due to open in 2027, will run from Swords to Sandyford, serving Dublin Airport and the city centre.

However, the plan now expected to be confirmed by the National Transport Authority (NTA) will see one tunnel being bored under the city rather than the two initially expected.

Dublin city councillors were given an indication of the revised thinking by the NTA at a local area meeting yesterday. The move from two tunnels in either direction to one larger tunnel, which would come above ground in Santry, would avoid the need for a tunnelling site to be placed on the land owned by Na Fianna.

However, it is understood this will still mean some of Na Fianna’s grounds – but not the main GAA pitch – will be disrupted to build a new Metro station. This disruption would also last two years, as opposed to a previously-flagged seven.

Fine Gael Dublin North West TD Noel Rock said the “idea of Na Fianna’s main pitch becoming a tunnelling site for seven years was simply not a runner”.

“I would like to commend all involved for bringing about a significant alteration in this plan, which will now see the main pitch retained, the construction footprint reduced, and the timeframe of disruption reduced from seven years to two,” he added.

Paul McAuliffe, a Fianna Fáil councillor in the area, said: “Should this be the final decision, the massive effort of clubs and residents in fighting a proposal that would damage the economy should be acknowledged.”