Controversial Glasnevin memorial wall vandalised again

Attackers use sledgehammers and paint to deface monument

 The Glasnevin memorial wall after it was vandalised again. Photograph Nick Bradshaw

The Glasnevin memorial wall after it was vandalised again. Photograph Nick Bradshaw

 

Glasnevin’s necrology wall, unveiled in 2016 to remember all those who died during the Irish revolution, has been vandalised for a second time.

Intruders used sledgehammers and threw paint over the controversial memorial, which was to include names of all those who died from the Easter Rising in 1916, to the end of the Civil War in 1923. The list currently stops at 1918.*

Intruders used sledgehammers and threw paint over the controversial memorial which includes names of all those who died from the Easter Rising in 1916 to the end of the Civil War in 1923.

The vandals used a sledgehammer to remove the names of some of the British soldiers on the wall who were killed during the Easter Rising, but in doing so they also damaged the names of some of the Irish Volunteers who were killed.

The incident occurred at 3.40am on Tuesday morning. Gardaí are reviewing CCTV footage of the incident.

A Garda spokesman said: “Significant damage was caused to the stonework of the memorial plaque and it had also been defaced with paint. Garda inquires are continuing and the investigation is ongoing.”

Glasnevin Cemetery issued a short statement confirming that the incident occurred.

“Glasnevin Trust is currently engaging with the gardaí on the matter and will not be commenting further at this time.”

Ring of Remembrance

The wall was inspired by the Ring of Remembrance at Ablain-Saint-Nazaire in France, which was inaugurated in 2014 and remembers 580,000 soldiers from all sides who lost their lives in northern France in the first World War.

The intention with the Glasnevin wall is, according to Glasnevin Trust chairman John Green, to remember everybody in chronological order as to how they died “based on historical fact, without judgment or hierarchy. Each will be free to take from the wall what they wish”.

However, plans to include the Black and Tans and Auxiliaries on the wall may have to be put on hold following this latest attack.

The memorial was also attacked in April 2017 when vandals threw paint over it. They damaged the gold inlay lettering for some of the names including Patrick Pearse.

*This article was amended on February 7th, 2020