New Tallaght plan will restrict building of one-bed homes

SF’s Cathal King says high-rise apartments not conducive to building community

The Draft Tallaght Town Centre Local Area Plan also aims to  build a fourth stand at Tallaght Stadium and redevelop the Square Shopping Centre. Photograph: Brenda Fitzsimons/The Irish Times

The Draft Tallaght Town Centre Local Area Plan also aims to build a fourth stand at Tallaght Stadium and redevelop the Square Shopping Centre. Photograph: Brenda Fitzsimons/The Irish Times

 

Developers in the south Dublin area of Tallaght would have to demonstrate demand for one-bed homes if they wish to build them, a new development strategy for the area has said.

The Draft Tallaght Town Centre Local Area Plan, launched on Thursday, sets out policy proposals on future housing development in the area.

The population of Tallaght’s town centre has grown by 46 per cent since 2011, from 4,202 to 6,126. Almost 18,000 people are employed in the wider area.

Sustainable development is considered key in a part of the capital where some 5,000 new homes could be provided by 2026, and up to 12,800 further down the line.

“With the exception of student accommodation, proposals that include a high proportion of one-bedroom dwellings shall be required to demonstrate a need for such accommodation, based on local demand and the demographic profile of the area,” the document states.

Also included in the suggested development policy is that a minimum of 30 per cent of residential units have at least three bedrooms. The same proportion of new builds should be for owner occupation or private sales; a maximum of 60 per cent for the build-to-rent sector; and a minimum of 10 per cent for social housing.

Strike a balance

Cathal King, a Sinn Féin councillor of 16 years who grew up in the area, said it was crucial to strike a balance between economic need, housing and social infrastructure.

In particular, he is concerned about how policy might shape the recent emergence of strategic planning applications for high-density housing blocks.

We don’t want tower blocks where there are no facilities, no chance for our children to play

“I am not necessarily in favour of some of these [proposed] high-rises,” he said. “We do need housing but unfortunately what we have found in Tallaght is that where there are large-scale apartments it has led to transient communities – there is no real community-building.”

The area plan – which will now go to a first round of public consultation for the next six weeks – aims for a balanced approach.

“We don’t want tower blocks where there are no facilities, no chance for our children to play,” Mr King said.

According to the document, 79 per cent of people in the area are under 40 years old while 75 per cent of families are at the “pre-family to early family stage of their lives” compared to 32 per cent in the wider South Dublin County area.

South Dublin mayor Vicki Casserly said there was an opportunity to link strong existing education facilities such as Technological University Dublin (TUD) with local career paths.

“It’s [about] trying to create a hub of employment so that people who live in the area can work in the area,” she said.

Other aims within the six-year timeframe of the plan include the development of a fourth stand at Tallaght Stadium, redevelopment of the Square Shopping Centre and new schools.