Dublin property tax rise request deadline looms on Monday

Dublin houseowners can individually ask to have their local property charges increased

Local property tax: The amount of tax paid is based on the value of a property on May 1st, 2013. At the standard rate, a house then valued at €325,000 would have a property tax liability of €585.  Photograph: Rui Vieira

Local property tax: The amount of tax paid is based on the value of a property on May 1st, 2013. At the standard rate, a house then valued at €325,000 would have a property tax liability of €585. Photograph: Rui Vieira

 

Dublin homeowners have until Monday to tell Dublin City Council if they would like their local property tax charge to be increased next year.

City councillors could increase the amount currently paid by Dubliners by as much 35 per cent next year. Unlike councillors in some other counties, however, they cannot cut the charge.

The local property tax came into effect on July 1st, 2013. A half-year charge was payable in 2013 and a full-year charge payable from 2014 onwards.

The amount of tax paid is based on the value of the property on May 1st, 2013. At the standard rate, a house then valued at €325,000 would have a property tax liability of €585. A house valued at €675,000 would have a charge of €1,215.

One-year decision

If no notice of change is given to the Revenue Commissioners by September 30th, homeowners will be levied at the standard rate.

Last year Dublin City Council was one of 11 local authorities that chose to apply the full 15 per cent cut, meaning a homeowner who would have had a basic or standard charge of €585 paid €497.25, while those who would have been liable to pay €1,215, were only charged €1,032.75.

If councillors again vote next month to apply the 15 per cent reduction, the charges paid by Dublin householders would remain the same in 2017 as in 2016. Or councillors could decide to increase the basic rate by up to 15 per cent, which would mean those currently paying €497.25 would have to pay €672.50 and those with a bill of €1,032.75, would see this jump to €1,397.25.

It is unlikely city councillors will vote for such a hike, but they are expected to come under pressure to make some increase to the current charge. The full 15 per cent reduction last year represented €11.6 million in income foregone by the council.

While the power to vary the charge rests with councillors, they must consider feedback from the public as part of the decision-making process.

Submissions can by completing the online survey on Dublin City Council’s website by 4.30pm on Monday.