Dublin climate action plan sets ambitious targets for capital

Council to adopt renewable energy, reduce carbon emissions and make city ‘climate resilient’

Dublin exposure: flooding risk due to more intense storms and sea-level rise makes the capital especially vulnerable as so much of the city is located at the mouth of the Liffey and built on reclaimed land. Photograph: Bryan O’Brien

Dublin exposure: flooding risk due to more intense storms and sea-level rise makes the capital especially vulnerable as so much of the city is located at the mouth of the Liffey and built on reclaimed land. Photograph: Bryan O’Brien

 

Dublin City Council has signed off on a climate action plan that sets ambitious targets for the capital in adopting renewable energy, reducing carbon emissions and making it “climate resilient” in withstanding extreme weather events.

The final plan contains 219 actions covering energy and buildings; transport, flood resilience, nature-based solutions and resource management (waste and water).

Its key targets include a 33 per cent better energy use by the council by 2020 and a 40 per cent reduction in its greenhouse gas emissions by 2030. It also aims to make Dublin a climate-resilient region by reducing the impacts of future (and current) climate change-related events and actively engaging and inform citizens on climate change.

The plan was formally presented on Tuesday to Minister for Climate Action and Environment Richard Bruton by Lord Mayor Paul McAuliffe and council chief executive Owen Keegan.

The city was required to produce its own plan under the national adaptation framework and the national climate action plan announced by Mr Bruton earlier this year.

Flooding risk

It acknowledges Dublin’s climate “is changing and this poses significant risks and challenges to all of those living in the region”. Flooding risk due to more intense storms and sea-level rise makes Dublin especially vulnerable as so much of the city is located at the mouth of the river Liffey and built on reclaimed land.

The plan, covering the period up to 2024, was produced in association with Codema (Dublin’s energy agency) and the Dublin Metropolitan Climate Action Regional Office (CARO).

In February, almost 500 people attended the launch at the Mansion House in advance of a six-week consultation period. More than 240 submissions were received before the plan was adopted by city council members.

“Through the actions contained in this plan, Dublin City Council will take a leadership role by increasing the resilience of the city to extreme weather events, reducing energy use and applying low-carbon solutions to its services,” said Mr Mc Auliffe.

Carbon emissions

Mr Keegan underlined the city’s commitment to reduce carbon emissions and to adapt to the inevitable consequences of climate disruption.

“The actions presented in this plan will guide the city as we prepare for, respond to, and adapt to the impacts of climate change, taking measures to allow us to live with climate change. The actions will also facilitate a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.”

CARO regional co-ordinator David Dodd said: “Bringing forward actions across both the mitigation and adaptation areas can influence and encourage other sectors and Dublin residents to embed climate action into their daily lives. To realise the plan, the council is leading on the message that every action counts.”

All four local authorities in Dublin have come together under CARO to produce individual climate action plans for their specific areas.