Former New York Times editor appointed as adjunct professor at DCU

Jill Abramson will serve two-year term at university’s school of communications

Jill Abramson, pictured in 2011 when she was announced as executive editor of the New York Times, flanked by then managing editor Dean Baquet and outgoing editor Bill Keller. Photograph: The New York Times

Jill Abramson, pictured in 2011 when she was announced as executive editor of the New York Times, flanked by then managing editor Dean Baquet and outgoing editor Bill Keller. Photograph: The New York Times

 

A former executive editor of The New York Times has been appointed as adjunct professor at DCU’s school of communications.

Jill Abramson was the first female executive editor in the newspaper’s 160-year history, holding the role from 2011 to 2014.

Ms Abramson’s appointment at DCU is for a two-year term and she will be the keynote speaker at a major international conference being held at the university later this year.

Professor Kevin Rafter, head of the school of communications at DCU, said: “In her role as adjunct professor, Jill Abramson will bring her wealth of experience as DCU revamps its teaching in the areas of media, journalism and communications.”

She is currently teaching journalism at Harvard University and also writes for international publications, including a regular political column for The Guardian.

Over a seventeen-year career at the The New York Times, Ms Abramson served as Washington bureau chief and managing editor.

Ms Abramson also spent nine years at The Wall Street Journal as deputy Washington bureau chief and an investigative reporter covering finance and politics.

She is the author of three books, including Strange Justice, co-authored with Jane Mayer, which examined controversy surrounding a US Supreme Court confirmation hearing.

In addition to her current position as a lecturer in Harvard, Jill Abramson has taught at both Princeton and Yale.

She is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and The American Philosophical Society.