Cyberbullying soared during lockdown. What are schools doing about it?

A new DCU programme helps pupils spot bullying behaviour before it gets out of hand

Experts agree that education plays a key role in reducing cyberbullying , but say one-off anti-bullying lessons in schools have a limited impact. Photograph: iStock

Experts agree that education plays a key role in reducing cyberbullying , but say one-off anti-bullying lessons in schools have a limited impact. Photograph: iStock

Digital platforms have proved a lifeline for students during school closures – but there’s been a hidden downside. All that time spent online – whether on social media or gaming consoles – has resulted in a sharp increase increase in cyberbullying, according to new research by DCU’s National Anti-Bullying Research and Resource Centre.

Cyberbullying among children and adolescents soared by 28 per cent during the lockdown. The younger children were, the more likely they were to become victims. The problem is particularly prevalent in young boys aged 10-16, with nearly 50 per cent experiencing more cyberbullying since the first lockdown.

The Irish Times
Please subscribe or sign in to continue reading.
The Irish Times

How can I keep reading?

You’ve reached an article that is only available to Irish Times subscribers.

Subscribe today and get the full picture for just €1 for the first month.

Subscribe No obligation, cancel any time.