Son charged with murdering mother (88) in his Clontarf home

Court told Brendan Murray (61) had ‘serious mental health difficulties’

  A garda   at the scene of the death of the  woman  at a house on Kincora Court, Clontarf. Photograph: Colin Keegan/Collins Dublin

A garda at the scene of the death of the woman at a house on Kincora Court, Clontarf. Photograph: Colin Keegan/Collins Dublin

 

A 61-year-old man with “serious mental health difficulties” has been charged with the murder of his elderly mother at his home in Clontarf in Dublin.

Neasa Murray (88) who lived at Kincora Drive, was found following a fatal assault, shortly before 8pm on Sunday. She had been visiting the home of her son, Brendan Murray, at nearby Kincora Court. Neasa Murray had lived alone following the death of her husband in 2018.

Gardaí and paramedics were alerted and the pensioner was pronounced dead at the detached red-brick house. The scene was sealed off for forensic examination. The grandmother’s remains were examined at the scene by a pathologist before being removed for a full postmortem examination.

Brendan Murray was arrested and held at Clontarf Garda station. He was brought before Judge John Brennan at a special late sitting of Dublin District Court on Tuesday evening. He was charged with murder.

Dressed in a blue sweater and grey tracksuit bottoms, Mr Murray repeatedly blessed himself and muttered quietly throughout the brief hearing. He also rocked back and forth as he sat in the dock at the side of the courtroom.

Det Sgt David Ennis told Judge Brennan that the accused was cautioned at 5.30pm at Clontarf station and replied: “I admit it”.

He was charged half an hour later and his reply when he was handed a copy of the charge sheet was: “Guilty, she was vile”.

The District Court does not have jurisdiction to hear a bail application in a murder case.

Gardaí pictured at the scene of the death of Neasa Murray at a house on Kincora Court, Clontarf, Dublin. Photograph: Colin Keegan, Collins Dublin
Gardaí pictured at the scene of the death of Neasa Murray at a house on Kincora Court, Clontarf, Dublin. Photograph: Colin Keegan, Collins Dublin

Det Sgt Ennis applied for a remand in custody. The accused stood up and then sat down, again blessing himself.

His solicitor Michael French told Judge Brennan that his client “suffers from serious mental health difficulties” and he asked for a short remand.

He also requested that his client would have an “urgent psychiatric assessment on arrival at Cloverhill”.

“It may be a situation that he will be transferred elsewhere,” Mr French added.

Judge Brennan remanded him in custody, pending the preparation of a book of evidence, to appear at Cloverhill District Court via video-link on Friday morning. He also directed a psychiatric assessment.

Legal aid was granted after the judge noted Mr Murray was on social welfare. There was no Garda objection.