These classic peanut butter biscuits are quick and easy

Kids will enjoy rolling the cookie dough into balls and imprinting the tops with a fork

What could be better than freshly baked cookies dunked in a cold glass of milk after a boisterous school day?

What could be better than freshly baked cookies dunked in a cold glass of milk after a boisterous school day?

 

I love the variety that cooking with the seasons brings. During the hot days of summer, chilled soups, salads and scoops of refreshing ice-cream mean we can avoid hot stoves altogether. When autumn inevitably arrives, something more warming and comforting is required. The oven is switched back on and baking starts again in earnest.

These classic peanut butter biscuits are quick and easy. I used to bake them often as a child. They are still very popular in America. They make the perfect baking activity as the dark evenings draw in.

Kids will enjoy rolling the cookie dough into balls and imprinting the tops with a fork. The peanut butter makes the dough a little more dense than a standard cookie dough.

Refrigerating the dough and then slightly flattening each cookie before baking means the cookies will bake evenly. I like to press a peanut into the top of each cookie, so they are easy to identify as containing nuts (your house will most likely be filled with monkey nuts over the coming weeks, so crack a few open).

The best peanut butter contains only peanuts and maybe a little added salt. As the roasted peanuts are chopped more and more finely, they start to give off their oil and produce that characteristic buttery texture. I love the texture a crunchy peanut butter adds to these cookies, but you may prefer to use a smooth version which will give a creamier consistency when mixing the dough.

These cookies would also work with other nut butters, so try experimenting with your favourite. Try other nut butters such as almond, pistachio or hazelnut.

PEANUT BUTTER BISCUITS 

Makes 12
Peanuts are often not permitted in schools so, rather than a lunchbox treat, save these for an after-school snack. What could be better than freshly baked cookies dunked in a cold glass of milk after a boisterous school day? You might even decide to serve them for a Halloween party. Since the raw dough contains nuts, it doesn’t freeze well.

These classic peanut butter biscuits are quick and easy
These classic peanut butter biscuits are quick and easy

Ingredients
100g butter, at room temperature
150g soft brown sugar
1 egg
½ tsp vanilla essence
75g crunchy peanut butter, room temperature
150g plain flour
Pinch of salt
Handful of peanuts

Method
Preheat an oven to 180 degrees Celsius, fan, or equivalent.  Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper.

2 Place butter and sugar in a mixing bowl and cream together to a smooth consistency using an electric whisk. 

3 Gradually whisk in the egg and vanilla essence.

4 Next incorporate the crunchy peanut butter to a smooth consistency.

5 In a separate bowl, sift together the flour and salt. Add the sifted ingredients to the buttery dough until fully combined. Either roll the dough into 2.5cm balls and freeze them for 10 minutes, or refrigerate the dough for one hour to allow it to firm up before rolling into balls.

6 Transfer the balls onto the lined baking sheet and lightly imprint the top of each biscuit with the back of a fork (allow enough space between the cookies, to allow them enough room to spread slightly). Place a peanut on the top of each cookie.

7 Bake in the preheated oven for approximately 12 minutes or until the biscuits turn golden in colour with slightly crispened edges (the length of time baking will depend on the size of the cookies).

8 Allow to cool on the baking sheet for two minutes before transferring the biscuits to a wire rack to cool completely before serving.  Store in an airtight container for two to three days.

Variation: Add some white or dark chocolate chunks to make peanut choc chip cookies

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